Of Love and Other Demons

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Penguin Books, 1996 - Fiction - 147 pages
385 Reviews
Of Love and Other Demons is set in a South American seaport in the colonial era, a time of viceroys and bishops, enlightened men and Inquisitors, saints and lepers and pirates. Sierva Maria, only child of a decaying noble family, has been raised in the slaves' courtyard of her father's cobwebbed mansion while her mother succumbs to fermented honey and cacao on a faraway plantation. On her twelfth birthday the girl is bitten by a rabid dog, and even as the wound is healing she is made to endure therapies indistinguishable from tortures. Believed, finally, to be possessed, she is brought to a convent for observation. And into her cell stumbles Father Cayetano Delaura, the Bishop's protege, who has already dreamed about a girl with hair trailing after her like a bridal train; who is already moved by this kicking, spitting, emaciated creature strapped to a stone bed.

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3 stars
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Writing was intriguing, ending was dramatic. - Goodreads
He is a weak man with poor judgment. - Goodreads
Beautiful, stunning prose. - Goodreads
I fell in love with his writing with this book. - Goodreads
Such a fascinating, dramatic and realistic love story - Goodreads
I was entertained and found it easy to read. - Goodreads
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This book was too scatter-brained and often is difficult to follow. Though Gabriel Garcia Marquez is a talented writer, I feel this is his weakest book. The characters are never described enough or allowed to develop enough for the reader to establish any type of connection or favoritism. There is also a lack of environmental explanation that diminishes a reader's ability to comprehend the circumstances, unless one has had recent and extensive background of the period after the Bourbons come to the Spanish monarchy and the long-relationship between the Catholic Church and the Spanish state. Such research that is required for this book's full comprehension is far too extensive for such a short book. I did not like this book in the very least. 

Review: Of Love and Other Demons

User Review  - João Bernardo - Goodreads

Gabriel García Márquez never disappoints me! Had the oportunity to read this one in Spanish and (as usual) Gabriel's writing is incredibly magic! Read full review

Contents

Chapter ONE
viii
Chapter TWO
34
Chapter THREE
62
Copyright

2 other sections not shown

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About the author (1996)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia. After studying law and journalism at the National University of Colombia in Bogota, he became a journalist. In 1965, he left journalism, to devote himself to writing. Acclaimed for both his craft and his imagination, he has been called a master of myth and magical realism (a style of literature that makes use of fantastical, highly improbable, and sometimes supernatural events and characters). In his novels and stories he has created a fictional world out of his memories of the dust, rain, and boredom of life in an isolated Colombian community. His stories depict a world shaped by myth, history, politics, and nature. Garcia Marquez first created Macondo, his fictional town, in his short story collections Leaf Storm (1955) and No One Writes to the Colonel (1961), but it was the novel One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) that brought both Macondo and Garcia Marquez to world attention. One Hundred Years of Solitude traces a century in the town's history, from its founding through its destruction by a cyclone. Skillfully blending the fantastic, the mythical, and the commonplace in a humorous and powerful narrative, Garcia Marquez tells a moving tale of people locked in an isolation, partly of their own making and partly due to U.S. and European cultural and political domination of Latin America. With this work, Garcia Marquez established himself internationally as a major novelist, and his reputation has continued to grow since he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1982.

Acclaimed for her best-selling translations of Cervantes, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and Mario Vargas Llosa, Edith Grossman received the 2006 PEN/Ralph Manheim Award for Translation. She lives in New York City.

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