Science Papers: Chiefly Pharmacological and Botanical (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1876 - Botany - 543 pages
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Page 404 - Columbia will ever supersede America. In our science, the names established throughout the works of Linnaeus are become current coin, nor can they be altered without great inconvenience. Perhaps, if he had foreseen the future authority and popularity of his writings, he might himself have improved upon many which he adopted out of deference to his predecessors, and it is, in some cases, to be regretted that he has not sufficiently done so.
Page 177 - Koch, a large umbelliferous plant, native of the south of Europe, and of Asia Minor. There is no modern account of the collection of this drug, nor is its place of production ascertained. RHUBARB. Determine the true source of the various sorts of medicinal rhubarb, especially of the Chinese rhubarb sold at Kiachta to the Russians, and of that exported from Canton. Strange to say, we are still in the dark respecting the real origin of this most valuable drug ! In this and all such cases the drug...
Page 229 - Wheu vegetable matter is burnt, it is destroyed ; but when the Tan-slia (ciunabar) is subjected to heat, it produces mercury. After passing through other changes, it returns to its original form. It differs widely, therefore, from vegetable substances, and hence it has the power of making men live for ever, and raising them to the rank of the genii. He who knows this doctrine, is...
Page 78 - This compound does not crystallize, and could not be obtained in a state of purity. Nitric acid oxidizes Rottlerine, forming at first a yellow resinous matter, and by longer continued action a quantity of oxalic acid. Concentrated sulphuric acid in the cold dissolves it with a yellow colour, which, on the application of a gentle heat, becomes first red, and finally very dark, sulphurous acid being evolved. Heated on platinum it...
Page 378 - The gum exudes from the stem in consequence of the puncture of [a beetle, and falling to the ground becomes contaminated with earth, for which reason it does not suit the London market ; but it is used in all parts of the country for cataplasms and fumigations. Lindley, from the examination of specimens sent to England from Tangier in 1839, determined the plant affording African ammoniacum to be the Ferula...
Page 360 - Tarentum in Calabria; neither the date of his birth nor that of his death is known, but it would appear that he was living between AD 1442 and...
Page 118 - It is found necessary, every 3 or 4 weeks, to cut off the old charred surfaces and burn it afresh ; in large healthy trees abounding in balsam, they even cut a second notch in some other part of the tree, and char it as the first. ' These operations are performed during the months of November, December, January and February. Should any of the trees appear sickly the following season, one or more years
Page 124 - Cradled in snow and fann'd by arctic air, Shines, gentle Barometz ! thy golden hair ; Rooted in earth each cloven hoof descends, And round and round her flexile neck she bends ; Crops the grey coral moss and hoary thyme, Or laps with rosy tongue the melting rime. Eyes with mute tenderness her distant dam, Or seems to bleat, a Vegetable Lamb.
Page 302 - August, there being scarcely any rain here, a small quantity is collected by a few enterprising Indians. The beating and application of rags is only made during four days of each week, that is four cosechas (harvests) per month. Should the flow of resin decrease, fresh heating and. rags are applied, and after eight days the boiling is resumed, and so on as long as the dry season permits. It was formerly the practice to apply fire to cuts made in the bark and to allow the exuding resin to burn for...
Page 487 - Ib. of p'is candell' for to light when the king's highness and goode grace on a nyght come unto his said grete wardrobe, and at other divers tymes.

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