Practical Ethics (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1892 - Conduct of life - 208 pages
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Page 83 - Myself will to my darling be Both law and impulse: and with me The girl, in rock and plain In earth and heaven, in glade and bower Shall feel an overseeing power To kindle or restrain. 'She shall be sportive as the fawn That wild with glee across the lawn Or up the mountain springs; And hers shall be the breathing balm, And hers the silence and the calm* Of mute insensate things.
Page 84 - Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods And mountains; and of all that we behold From this green earth...
Page 82 - Nor less I deem that there are powers Which of themselves our minds impress ; That we can feed this mind of ours In a wise passiveness.
Page 115 - For life, with all it yields of joy and woe, And hope and fear, - believe the aged friend, Is just our chance o...
Page 93 - A THING of beauty is a joy for ever : Its loveliness increases ; it will never Pass into nothingness ; but still will keep A bower quiet for us, and a sleep Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Page 101 - He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. " He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small ; For the dear God who loveth us He made and loveth all.
Page 99 - I stand and look at them long and long. They do not sweat and whine about their condition, They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins, They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God...
Page 75 - Tis, finally, the Man, who, lifted high, Conspicuous object in a Nation's eye, Or left unthought-of in obscurity, Who, with a toward or untoward lot, Prosperous or adverse, to his wish or not Plays, in the many games of life, that one Where what he most doth value must be won...
Page 95 - The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus: 3 Let no such man be trusted.
Page 33 - A second man I honour and still more highly, him who is seen toiling for the spiritually indispensable, not daily bread but the bread of life.

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