An address delivered before the Peithessophian and Philoclean societies of Rutgers college, Volume 47, Issue 2 (Google eBook)

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Rutgers press, Terhune & Letson, printers, 1838 - Character - 34 pages
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Page 16 - By heaven, methinks it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-faced moon, Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks...
Page 35 - ... great or useful. Instead of being progressive in anything, he will be at best stationary, and more probably retrograde in all. It is only the man who carries into his pursuits that great quality which Lucan ascribes to...
Page 36 - He commences the study of the dead languages ; presently comes a friend, who tells him he is wasting his time, and that, instead of obsolete words, he had much better employ himself in acquiring new ideas. He changes his plan, and sets to work at the mathematics. Then comes another friend, who asks him, with a grave and sapient face, whether he intends to become a professor in a college ; because, if he does not, he is misemploying his time ; and that, for the business of life, common mathematics...
Page 47 - Why should such a man falter in his course ? He may be slandered ; he may be deserted by the world ; but he has that within, which will keep him erect, and enable him to move onward in his course, with his eyes fixed on heaven, which he knows will not desert him.
Page 16 - ... exertion, this vigorous power of profound and searching investigation, this careering and wide-spreading comprehension of mind, and those long reaches of thought, that, Pluck bright honor from the pale-faced moon. Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom line could never touch the ground. And drag up drowned honor by the locks...
Page 15 - You will see issuing from the walls of the same college nay, sometimes from the bosom of the same family, two young men, of whom the one shall be admitted to be a genius of high order, the other scarcely above the point of mediocrity ; yet you shall see the genius sinking and perishing in poverty, obscurity, and wretchedness ; while, on the other hand, you shall observe the mediocre plodding his slow but sure way up the hill of life, gaining steadfast footing at every step, and mounting,...
Page 48 - ... and substitutes in their place a bolder, loftier, and nobler spirit: one that will dispose you to consider yourselves as born, not so much for yourselves, as for your country, and your fellow creatures, and which will lead you to act on every occasion sincerely, justly, generously, magnanimously. There is a morality on a larger scale, perfectly consistent with a just attention to your own affairs, which it would be the height of folly to neglect: a generous expansion, a proud elevation, and conscious...
Page 48 - ... character, which is the best preparation for a decided course, in every situation into which- you can be thrown ; and, it is to this high and noble tone of character that I would have you to aspire. I would not have you to resemble those weak and meagre streamlets, which lose their direction at every petty impediment that presents itself, and stop, and turn back, and creep around, and search out every little channel through which they may wind their feeble and sickly course. Nor yet would I have...
Page 15 - Genius, unexerted, is like the poor moth, that flutters around a candle - till it scorches itself to death. If genius be desirable at all, it is only of that great and magnanimous kind, which, like the Condor of South America, pitches from the...
Page 49 - But I would have you like the ocean, that noblest emblem of majestic decision, which, in the calmest hour, still heaves its resistless might of waters to the shore, filling the heavens, day and night, with the echoes of its sublime declaration of independence, and tossing and sporting on its bed with an imperial consciousness of strength that laughs at opposition. It is this depth, and weight, and power, and purity of character, that I would have you...

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