A System of Logic, Ratiocinative and Inductive: Being a Connected View of the Principles of Evidence and the Methods of Scientific Investigation, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John W. Parker, 1843 - Knowledge, Theory of
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Contents

II
17
III
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IV
27
V
59
VI
103
VII
116
VIII
145
IX
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
370
XXII
381
XXIII
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XXIV
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X
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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Popular passages

Page 404 - The cause, then, philosophically speaking, is the sum total of the conditions, positive and negative, taken together; the whole of the contingencies of every description, which being realized, the consequent invariably follows.
Page 455 - If an instance in which the phenomenon under investigation occurs, and an instance in which it does not occur, have every circumstance in common save one, that one occurring only in the former; the circumstance in which alone the two instances differ is the effect, or the cause, or an indispensable part of the cause, of the phenomenon.
Page 380 - Why is a single instance, in some cases, sufficient for a complete induction ; while in others, myriads of concurring instances, without a single exception known or presumed, go such a very little way towards establishing a universal proposition ? Whoever can answer this question, knows more of the philosophy of logic than the wisest of the ancients, and has solved the problem of induction.
Page 372 - Whatever be the most proper mode of expressing it, the proposition that the course of nature is uniform is the fundamental principle, or general axiom, of Induction.
Page 309 - I conceive, be found, if we advert to one of the characteristic properties of geometrical forms their capacity of being painted in the imagination with a distinctness equal to reality : in other words, the exact resemblance of our ideas of form to the sensations which suggest them.
Page 245 - All men are mortal, Socrates is a man, therefore Socrates is mortal; it is unanswerably urged by tlie adversaries of the syllogistic theory, that the proposition, Socrates is mortal, is presupposed in the more general assumption, All men are mortal...
Page 465 - Subduct from any phenomenon such part as is known by previous inductions to be the effect of certain antecedents, and the residue of the phenomenon is the effect of the remaining antecedents.
Page 397 - The only notion of a cause, which the theory of induction requires, is such a notion as can be gained from experience. The Law of Causation, the recognition of which is the main pillar of inductive science, is but the familiar truth, that invariability of succession is found by observation to obtain between every fact in nature and some other fact which has preceded it...
Page 475 - ... first law of motion, viz., that all bodies in motion continue to move in a straight line with uniform velocity until acted upon by some new force. This assertion is in open opposition to first appearances; all terrestrial objects, when in motion, gradually abate their velocity and at last stop, which, accordingly, the ancients, with their inductio per enumerationem simplicem, imagined to be the law.
Page 27 - A name is a word taken at pleasure to serve for a mark which may raise in our mind a thought like to some thought we had before, and which being pronounced to others may be to them a sign of what thought the speaker had before in his mind.

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