The Works of the Late Right Honourable Henry St. John, Lord Viscount Bolingbroke, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Johnson, 1809 - Great Britain
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 233 - For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle ? (which is yet none of the most abstract comprehensive and difficult) ; for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon, but all and none of these at once.
Page 46 - And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, 'If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, so that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the Lord be my God. And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God's house; and of all that thou shall give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.
Page 91 - Rather than creep up slowly, a posteriori, to a little general knowledge, they soar at once as far and as high as imagination can carry them. From thence they descend again, armed with systems and arguments a priori; and, regardless how these agree or clash with the phenomena of Nature, they impose them on mankind.
Page 329 - ... that what we call death, must therefore reduce it to a state of absolute insensibility and inactivity, which to it would be equal to non-existence. For that body, which is so necessary to it, may be some fine vehicle, that dwells with it in the brain, and goes off with it at death.
Page 266 - But the notion of inspiration has ended in mystery where the other began: and this expedient, the only one that can support it at all, would support it effectually, if these ages resembled a little better those wherein the belief of the real presence was first established. It may be said, that an extraordinary action of God in the human mind, which the word inspiration is now used to denote, is not more inconceivable than the ordinary action of mind on body, and of body on mind ; and I confess that...
Page 323 - For I see no contradiction in it, that the first eternal thinking being should, if he pleased, give to certain systems of created senseless matter, put together as he thinks fit, some degrees of sense, perception, and thought: though, as I think, I have proved, lib.
Page 363 - Car il est constant que l'esprit aperçoit l'infini, quoiqu'il ne le comprenne pas ; et qu'il a une idée très distincte de Dieu, qu'il ne peut avoir que par l'union qu'il a avec lui ; puisqu'on ne peut pas concevoir que l'idée d'un être infiniment parfait, qui est celle que nous avons de Dieu, soit quelque chose de créé.
Page 59 - Let there be lights in the firmament of heaven, to divide the day from the night, and to give light upon the earth; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and for years.
Page 99 - Let us proceed agreeably to these maxims. Let us seek truth, but seek it quietly as well as freely. Let us not imagine, like some who are called free-thinkers, that every man, who can think and judge for himself, as he has a right to do, has therefore a right of speaking, any more than of acting, according to the full freedom of his thoughts. The freedom belongs to him as a rational creature. He lies under the restraint as a member of society.
Page 109 - ... the man who was consciously certain that he had truth and reason on his side. The authority of the schools lasted till the resurrection of letters. But as soon as real knowledge was enlarged, and the conduct of the understanding better understood, it fell into contempt. The advocates of artificial theology have had since that time a very hard task.

Bibliographic information