Leaves from the Note-book of a New York Detective (Google eBook)

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Dick & Fitzgerald, 1865 - Detectives - 186 pages
4 Reviews
  

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Review: Leaves from the Note-Book of a New York Detective: The Private Record of JB

User Review  - Bev Hankins - Goodreads

A wonderful look at the early American Detective novel. Very good! Read full review

Review: Leaves from the Note-Book of a New York Detective: The Private Record of JB

User Review  - Elizabeth Hunter - Goodreads

At times these stories became a bit repetitive (how many rich old men with nubile nieces were there in the Big Apple?!) but it was fascinating not only to read mysteries from before the tropes were established, but also to catch a glimpse of 19th century New York in these pages. Read full review

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Page 70 - How long I slept I know not, but I was awakened by a slight movement in the room, and looking up, I saw Aunt Agnes's bed empty.
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Page 113 - ... in the afternoon enabled me to procure fire, which, in the usual manner, I carried to my camping-place. There I built a fire, and to protect myself from the wind, which was blowing violently, lashing the lake into foam, I made a bower of pine boughs, crept under it, and very soon fell asleep. How long I slept I know not, but I was aroused by the snapping and cracking of the burning foliage, to find my shelter and the adjacent forest in a broad sheet of flame.
Page 90 - ORNULF sits on a stone, in front on the right, his head bare, his elbows resting on his knees, and his face buried in his hands. His men are digging at the mound; some give light with pine-knot torches. After a short pause, SIGURD and DAGNY enter from the boat-house, where a wood Jire is burning.
Page 45 - By the agreed statement of facts it was conceded, among other things, that the defendant was, and is not, employed a major portion of his time in the service of the said railroad company. On motion of the defendant's counsel the court directed the jury to return a verdict of not guilty, which was accordingly done; the defendant was discharged, and the cause was thereupon dismissed.
Page 128 - ... belonged to him. A coroner's jury was summoned and Harvey Johnston was committed to take his trial at the ensuing assizes for the wilful murder of Mr. McLeod, and every one who read the details of the coroner's inquest appeared to be perfectly satisfied of his guilt. Such was the substance of Hiss McLeod's statement to me, of course in her relation she frequently wept, and made repeated asseverations of her lover's innocence.
Page 12 - The bullet had penetrated the brain, so that there could be no doubt as to the cause of his death. When Steiner was brought into the presence of the corpse, he showed not the slightest emotion, and merely observed, " That is the magistrate Elsperger, of this place.

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