The Woman in Black: A Ghost Story

Front Cover
David R. Godine Publisher, 2002 - Juvenile Fiction - 138 pages
8 Reviews
1986 Set on the obligatory English moor, on an isolated cause-way, the story stars an up-and-coming young solicitor who sets out to settle the estate of Mrs. Drablow. Routine affairs quickly give way to a tumble of events and secrets more sinister than any nightmare. This first-class thriller - lately reincarnated on the stage - is a brilliant exercise in controlled horror. A real spine-tingler by a real master.
  

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Review: The Woman in Black

User Review  - Nancy Oakes - Goodreads

like a 3.8 rounded up. I am surprised at a number of reader reviews here, but I guess as with everything else, my life motto à chacun à son goût applies. I enjoyed this book -- I went into it with no ... Read full review

Review: The Woman in Black

User Review  - Gloria Mundi - Goodreads

I read this book mainly because I went to see the play at the Fortune Theatre in London a few weeks ago. The play was really good. It wasn't the scariest thing I have ever experienced, as some reviews ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
15
III
23
IV
29
V
45
VI
59
VII
70
VIII
79
IX
86
X
105
XI
114
XII
132
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Author Susan Hill was born in Scarborough, United Kingdom on February 5, 1942. She graduated from King's College in London in 1963 and became a full-time writer. She worked as a freelance journalist between 1963 and 1968 and has been a monthly columnist for the Daily Telegraph since 1977. She founded her own publishing company, Long Barn Books, in 1996 and publishes a literary magazine called Books and Company. She has written works of fiction and non-fiction as well as children's books. She also edits short story compilations. She won numerous awards including a Somerset Maugham Award for I'm the King of the Castle; the Whitbread Novel Award for The Bird of Night; the Mail on Sunday/John Llewellyn Rhys Prize for The Albatross, and the Smarties Prize for Can It Be True? She currently lives in Cotswolds with her husband.

Lawrence is director of the Lamar Dodd Art Center.

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