Rural economy, in its relations with chemistry, physics, and meteorology, or Chemistry applied to agriculture (Google eBook)

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Appleton, 1854 - 507 pages
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Page 498 - In the year 1800, the population of this favored valley, where the cultivation of indigo, of cotton, of cocoa, and the cane had made immense progress, was as dense as it was in the most thickly populated districts of England or France, and every one was delighted with the appearance of comfort that prevailed in the numerous villages of this industrious country.
Page 2 - ... were obtained, are displayed with such absolute perspicuity as to be intelligible and instructive to every agricultural inquirer, however superficial his previous acquaintance may be with the details of chemical science. Nothing from the pen of the Editor could throw additional light upon the Author's...
Page 482 - In other words, the duration of the vegetation appears to be in the inverse ratio of the mean temperature ; so that if we multiply the number of days during which a given plant grows in different climates, by the mean temperature of each we obtain numbers that are very nearly equal. This result is not only remarkable in so far as it seems to indicate that upon every parallel of latitude, at all elevations above the level of the sea, the same plant receives in the course of its existence an equal...
Page 482 - ... shorter as the mean temperature of the cycle itself is lower or higher. In other words, the duration of the vegetation appears to be in the inverse ratio of the mean temperature ; so that if we multiply the number of days during which a given plant grows in different climates, by the mean temperature of each we obtain numbers that are very nearly equal.
Page 367 - ... vegetation which it contains, and that a time must come, when, without supplies of such mineral matters, the land would become unproductive from their abstraction In the neighborhood of large and populous towns, for instance, where the interest of the farmer and market-gardener is to send the largest possible quantity of produce to market, consuming the least possible quantity on the spot, the want 'of saline principles in the soil would very soon be felt, were it not that for every wagon-load...
Page 512 - By LORD MAHON. 2 large vols. 8vo. pp. 590, 609, well printed, $4. V. A DIGEST OF THE LAWS, CUSTOMS, MANNERS, AND INSTITUTIONS OF THE ANCIENT AND MODERN NATIONS. By THOMAS DEW, Late President of the College of William and Mary. 1 vol. 8vo. pp. 670, well printed. Price $2. VI. A MANUAL OF ANCIENT AND MODERN HISTORY. By WC TAYLOR, LL. D., Ac.
Page 1 - CONSIDERATIONS. Extract from Translator's Introduction. In the person of the distinguished author of this work the man of science is happily associated with the practical farmer the accomplished naturalist, the profound chemist and natural philosopher, and friend and fellow-laborer of Arago, Biot, Dumas, and all the leading minds of his age and country M.
Page 1 - Bouissangault's title to consideration is recognised wherever letters and civilization have extended their influence. Surely, the collected and carefully recorded experience of such a man must have value in the estimation of every educated mind, and cannot fail to be especially welcome to that class of readers who are professionally engaged in the practical application of that noble science which his labors have contributed to illustrate and advance. The chemical portion...
Page 5 - The interesting and ample instruction conveyed in the observations of this acute and profound observer upon the food and alimentary treatment of cattle of every species, accompanied as they are by minute details of the results obtained in the shape of organic and inorganic elements, cannot be too urgently recommended to the attentive consideration of every one interested in that important branch of rural economy to which they more particularly relate. The...
Page 240 - So that during its transformation, the urea has gained 3.4 of hy drogen, and 26.6 of oxygen. In water the hydrogen is to the oxygen as 1 to 8. (: : 1 : 8.) Now it is precisely in this proportion that hydrogen and oxygen are found to be acquired by the urea in passing into the state of cabonate of ammonia ; whence it follows that the elements of wale are fixed in the process.

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