Transparent: Love, Family, and Living the T with Transgender Teenagers

Front Cover
Harcourt, 2008 - Family & Relationships - 323 pages
20 Reviews
When Cris Beam first moved to Los Angeles, she thought she might put in just a few hours volunteering at a school for transgender kids while she got settled. Instead she found herself drawn deeply into the pained and powerful group of transgirls she discovered. In Transparent she intro­duces four of them—Christina, Domineque, Foxxjazell, and Ariel—and shows us their world, a dizzying mix of familiar teenage cliques and crushes with far less familiar challenges like how to morph your body on a few dollars a day. Funny, heartbreaking, defiant, and sometimes defeated, the girls form a singular community. But they struggle valiantly to resolve the gap between the way they feel inside and the way the world sees them—a struggle we can all identify with. Beam's careful reporting, sensitive writing, and intimate relationship with her characters place Transparent in the ranks of the best narrative nonfiction.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
9
3 stars
3
2 stars
2
1 star
0

Review: Transparent: Love, Family, and Living the T with Transgender Teenagers

User Review  - Dharma - Goodreads

Eh. The writing style is trite, the stories of her students not surprising, sad, but nothing one couldn't guess. It is more biography, memoir than a book I would recommend to someone working with the ... Read full review

Review: Transparent: Love, Family, and Living the T with Transgender Teenagers

User Review  - Holly - Goodreads

Cris Beam is fast becoming one of my favorite nonfiction authors. I wanted to read about her foster parenting of Christina - which she briefly references in "To the End of June" - but the author's ... Read full review

About the author (2008)

CRIS BEAM is a journalist who has written for several national magazines as well as for public radio. She has an MFA in nonfiction from Columbia University and teaches creative writing at Columbia and the New School. She lives in New York.

Bibliographic information