Liberty Under Law: An Interpretation of the Principles of Our Constitutional Government (Google eBook)

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University of Rochester, 1922 - Constitutional history - 51 pages
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Page 20 - Constitution which, adopted by however small popular vote, they have fully approved by more than one hundred and thirty years of acquiescence. It is this voluntary self-restraint that has made their Government permanent and strong. It is a fundamental error to seek quick action in making needed changes of policy or in redressing wrong. Nations live a long time, and a year or five years are a short period in that life. Most wrongs can be endured for a time without catastrophe. Reforms that are abiding...
Page 5 - ESTABLISHED IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER BY JAMES GOOLD CUTLER It appears to me that the most useful contribution which I can make to promote the making of democracy safe for the world (to invert Mr. Wilson's aphorism) is to found in The University of Rochester a course of lectures, designed to promote serious consideration, and consideration by as many people as possible, of certain points fundamental, and therefore vital, to the permanence of constitutional government in the United States. My...
Page 12 - Liberty Under Law", stated: The slightest study of the history of the framing of the Constitution shows that the members of the Convention, in large majority, thought that the permanence and safety of the new Government required provisions whicli would prevent a change of policy to meet every temporary wind of popular passion.
Page 21 - It is a fundamental error to seek quick action in making needed changes of policy or in redressing wrong. Nations live a long time, and a year or five years are a short period in that life. Most wrongs can be endured for a time without catastrophe. Reforms that are abiding are achieved step by step. It is better to endure wrongs than to effect disastrous changes in which the proposed remedy may be worse than the evil. Often things denounced as wrongs are not so. It needs attention and deliberation...
Page 51 - I am an optimist. I believe profoundly in our constitutional system and its value to us, because I believe it is the expression, accurate and responsive, of our American people. As it has preserved our liberties and happiness in the past, so may it serve us in our greater difficulties and achievements of the future.
Page 31 - No one can afford to be a candidate unless he can count upon the support of the regular party organization or unless he can create a personal organization, and that costs much money. It has not destroyed, it has strengthened the control of the machine; but it has taken from it an obligation of responsibility. In this state, you have an informal extra-legal preliminary convention to avoid some of the abuses of the general primary. It is to be hoped that this masqueraded means of neutralizing the primary...
Page 51 - I conceive of them, of many earnest supporters of what they call pure democracy, chiefly in forgetting that democracy is but a means to an end, just as liberty is. The end is the happiness of all individuals. To be useful, democracy and liberty must be regulated to attain this end and not to defeat it.
Page 26 - ... last analysis, personal liberty includes the right of property, as it includes the right of contract and the right of labor. Our primary conception of a free man is one who can enjoy what he earns, who can spend it for his comfort or pleasure if he would. . . . This is the right of property. . . . Personal liberty and the right of property are indispensable to any possible useful progress of society.
Page 30 - It has not only cost the public a heavy outlay; but, what is worse, it has made impossible as a candidate for an elective office every one who is not the choice of the machine or is not independently wealthy. No one can afford to be a candidate unless he can count upon the support of the regular party organization or unless he can create a personal organization, and that costs much money. It has not destroyed, it has strengthened 81 the control of the machine; but it has taken from it an obligation...
Page 25 - It rests on personal liberty , and the right of property. In the last analysis, personal liberty includes the right of property as it includes the right of contract and the right of labor.

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