Peerage of England. ... (Google eBook)

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F.C. and J. Rivington [and others], 1812 - Nobility
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Page 296 - He was of an industry and vigilance not to be tired out, or wearied by the most laborious; and of parts not to be imposed upon by the most subtle or sharp; and of a personal courage equal to his best parts...
Page 92 - An Act to explain and amend an act made in the twenty-second year of the reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, intituled, ' An Act for amending, explaining, and reducing into one Act of Parliament the laws relating to the government of His Majesty's ships, vessels, and forces by sea...
Page 296 - ... those from whom he pretended to learn and receive them. And even with them who were able to preserve themselves from his infusions, and discerned those opinions to be fixed in him, with which they could not comply, he always left the character of an ingenuous and conscientious person.
Page 296 - I am persuaded, his power and interest, at that time, was greater to do, good or hurt, than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time : for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias them.
Page 294 - He was not a man of many words, and rarely begun the discourse, or made the first entrance upon any business that was assumed ; but a very weighty speaker ; and after he had heard a full debate, and observed how the House was like to be inclined, took up the argument, and shortly, and clearly, and craftily so stated it, that he commonly conducted it to the conclusion he desired...
Page 296 - He was of that rare affability and temper in debate, and of that seeming humility and submission of judgment, as if he brought no opinion of his own with him, but a desire of information and instruction ; yet he had so subtle a way of interrogating, and under the notion of doubts, insinuating his objections; that he infused his own opinions 'into those from whom he pretended to learn and receive them.
Page 236 - After a grateful commemoration of the fifty-five years of union and happiness which he enjoyed with Mabel his wife, the good earl thus speaks from the tomb : What we gave, we have ; What we spent, we had ; What we left, we lost...
Page 388 - Venerable, off the coast of Holland, the 12th of October (by 1og llth) PM Camperdown ESE eight miles wind N. by E. 'SIR, " I HAVE the pleasure to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that at nine o'clock this morning I got sight of the Dutch fleet.
Page 236 - St. Johns, Talbots, Bohuns, and even the Plantagenets themselves; and in a contest with John of Lancaster, a Courtenay, bishop of London, and afterwards archbishop of Canterbury, might be accused of profane confidence in the strength and number of his kindred.
Page 296 - ... majority of voices, he would withdraw himself before the question, that he might seem not to consent to so much visible unreasonableness; which produced as great a doubt in some, as it did approbation in others, of his integrity.

References from web pages

JSTOR: Jane Austen and the Peerage
The analogue of 1 The genealogical data in this article come mainly from Arthur Collins, The Peerage of England, "third edition" (London, 1756), ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0030-8129(195312)68%3A5%3C1017%3AJAATP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-D

BLEWETT'S
Source: The Peerage of England Vol. 1. p.340-344. By: Arthur Collins. Printed for: London: W. Strahan, jf and C. Rivington, J. Hinton, T. Payne, W. Owen, ...
bluett.com/ engfact.doc

The Use of Royal Licences for Printing in England, 16951760: A ...
The Use of Royal Licences for Printing in England,. 16951760: A Bibliography. by. SHEF ROGERS. INTRODUCTION. B. ETWEEN THE LAPSE ...
library.oxfordjournals.org/ cgi/ reprint/ 1/ 2/ 133.pdf