Lost in the Barrens

Front Cover
McClelland & Stewart, Sep 1, 2009 - Adventure and adventurers - 224 pages
42 Reviews
Awasin, a Cree Indian boy, and Jamie, a Canadian orphan living with his uncle, the trapper Angus Macnair, are enchanted by the magic of the great Arctic wastes. They set out on an adventure that proves longer and more dangerous than they could have imagined. Drawing on his knowledge of the ways of the wilderness and the implacable northern elements, Farley Mowat has created a memorable tale of daring and adventure.

When first published in 1956, Lost in the Barrens won the Governor-General’s Award for Juvenile Literature, the Book-of-the-Year Medal of the Canadian Association of Children’s Librarians and the Boys’ Club of America Junior Book Award.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DeltaQueen50 - LibraryThing

Lost in the Barrens by Farley Mowat was a cracking adventure story of two boys, Jamie, a white boy who lives with his trapper uncle and his friend, Awasin a young Cree. They accidentally get left ... Read full review

Review: Lost in the Barrens

User Review  - Irene - Goodreads

This great adventure, with two very different boys learning to depend and trust each other in their battle to survive in the far north in winter. Mowat is an excellent writer and you feel like you are right there with the boys enduring their ordeal. Read full review

About the author (2009)

Farley Mowat was born in Belleville, Ontario, in 1921, and grew up in Belleville, Trenton, Windsor, Saskatoon, Toronto, and Richmond Hill. He served in World War II from 1940 until 1945, entering the army as a private and emerging with the rank of captain. He began writing for his living in 1949 after spending two years in the Arctic. Since 1949 he has lived in or visited almost every part of Canada and many other lands, including the distant regions of Siberia. He remains an inveterate traveller with a passion for remote places and peoples. He has twenty-five books to his name, which have been published in translations in over twenty languages in more than sixty countries. They include such internationally known works as People of the Deer, The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be, Never Cry Wolf, Westviking, The Boat That Wouldn’t Float, Sibir, A Whale for the Killing, The Snow Walker, And No Birds Sang, and Virunga: The Passion of Dian Fossey. His short stories and articles have appeared in The Saturday Evening Post, Maclean’s, Atlantic Monthly and other magazines.

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