Flowers and their teachings, by the author of 'Sunshine and shadows in Kattern's life'. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1874
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 45 - Hark, said Mr. Great-Heart, to what the shepherd's boy saith ! so they hearkened, and he said, He that is down needs fear no fall ; He that is low no pride; He that is humble ever shall Have God to be his Guide.
Page 58 - He gazed at the flowers with tearful eyes, He kissed their drooping leaves ; .' It was for the Lord of Paradise He bound them in his sheaves. '' My Lord has need of these flowerets gay," The Reaper said, and smiled ; 4.
Page 37 - Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon; As yet the early rising sun Has not attained his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the even-song; And, having prayed together, we Will go with you along.
Page 58 - I have nought that is fair?" saith he; "Have nought but the bearded grain? Though the breath of these flowers is sweet to me, I will give them all back again." He gazed at the flowers with tearful eyes, He kissed their drooping leaves ; It was for the Lord of Paradise He bound them in his sheaves. "My Lord has need of these flowerets gay...
Page 17 - DEEP on the convent-roof the snows Are sparkling to the moon : My breath to heaven like vapour goes : May my soul follow soon ! The shadows of the convent-towers Slant down the snowy sward, Still creeping with the creeping hours That lead me to my Lord : Make Thou my spirit pure and clear As are the frosty skies, Or this first snowdrop of the year That in my bosom lies. As these white robes are...
Page 59 - Dear tokens of the earth are they, Where he was once a child. "They shall all bloom in fields of light, Transplanted by my care, And saints, upon their garments white, These sacred blossoms wear.
Page 35 - I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
Page 154 - But some man will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body do they come? Thou fool ! that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die. And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be,, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other grain. But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body.
Page 159 - When, smitten by the morning ray, I see thee rise, alert and gay, Then, cheerful flower ! my spirits play With kindred gladness ; And when, at dusk, by dews opprest, Thou sink'st, the image of thy rest Hath often eased my pensive breast Of careful sadness.
Page 150 - Then youthful box, which now hath grace Your houses to renew, Grown old, surrender must his place Unto the crisped yew. When yew is out, then birch comes in, And many flowers beside, Both of a fresh and fragrant kin, To honour Whitsuntide. Green rushes then, and sweetest bents, With cooler oaken boughs, Come in for comely ornaments, To re-adorn the house.

Bibliographic information