Dan. Marble: A Biographical Sketch of that Famous and Diverting Humorist, with Reminiscences, Comicalities, Anecdotes, Etc., Etc (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Dewitt & Davenport, 1851 - Actors - 235 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 98 - York, who kindly requested me to read and correct it, equip it with prologue and epilogue, procure for it a favourable reception from the manager of Drury Lane, and make Murray or Constable bleed handsomely for the copyright; and on inspecting the cover, I found that I had been charged five pounds odd for the postage. This was bad enough but there was no help, so I groaned and submitted. A...
Page 233 - No mistake, Polly. I know very well how it all came about. That fellow, Sterritt, keeps the meanest sort of liquor, and always did liquor mean enough to make a man do any sort of a mean thing. I have always said it was mean enough to make a man steal, and now I have a practical illustration of the fact ! " and the poor old man burst into tears.
Page 32 - BELAY. To make a rope fast, by turns round a pin or coil, without hitching or seizing it. BEND. To make fast. To bend a sail is to make it fast to the yard. To bend a cable is to make it fast to the anchor. A bend is a knot by which one rope is made fast to another.
Page 227 - IA cross old woman came next, and whose look would have given any reasonable man the double-breasted blues before breakfast ; alongside of her was a rale backwoods preacher, with the biggest and ugliest mouth ever got up since the flood. He was flanked by the low comedian of the party, an Indiana hoosier, ' gwine down to Orleans to get an army contract ' to supply the forces then in Mexico with beef. " We rolled along for some time, nobody seemed inclined to
Page 227 - I'm sorry," says Dan, as he knocked the ashes from his regalia, as he sat in a small crowd over a glass of sherry, at Florence's, New York, one evening, " I'm sorry that the stages are disappearing so rapidly ; I never enjoyed travelling so well as in the slow coaches.
Page 233 - ... know very well how it all came about. That fellow, Sterritt, keeps the meanest sort of liquor, and always did; liquor mean enough to make a man do any sort of a mean thing. I have always said it was mean enough to make a man steal, and now I have a practical illustration of the fact!" and the poor old man burst into tears. "Don't be a child," said his wife, wiping away the tears.
Page 233 - A little of the soothing system operated upon the Judge, as such things usually do ; his extreme mortification was finally subdued, and over to Sterritt's he went with a tolerable face. Of course, he had but little difficulty in settling with him for aside from the fact that the Judge's integrity was unquestionable, he had an inkling of the joke that had been played. The Judge took his seat in Court-, but it was observed that he was sad and melancholy, and that his mind frequently wandered from...
Page 228 - Well, sir, it ain't anything else. A man that's got sense enuff to toller his own cow-bell with us ain't in no danger of starvin. I'm gwine down to Orleans to see if I can't git a contract out of Uncle Sam to feed the hoys what's been lickin them infernal Mexicans so bad.
Page 232 - I feel much better than I expected to feel after that frolic of last night.' " ' Ah, Judge,' said she, reproachfully, ' you are getting too old you ought to leave off that business.
Page 232 - Ah, Judge," said she, reproachfully, " you are getting too old you ought to leave off that business." "Ah, Polly ! what's the use of talking? " It was at this precise instant of time, that the Judge, having put on his overcoat, was proceeding, according to his usual custom, to give...

Bibliographic information