The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History

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Basic Books, 2001 - History - 521 pages
27 Reviews
Don Oberdorfer has written a gripping narrative history of Korea's travails and triumphs over the past three decades. The Two Koreas places the tensions between North and South within a historical context, with a special emphasis on the involvement of outside powers.
  

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Good overview on two Countries I knew little about. - Goodreads
A must-read for anybody writing on the peninsula. - Goodreads
And his research is well-sourced and documented. - Goodreads

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - xuebi - LibraryThing

Oberdorfer writes here a comprehensive and detailed modern history of North and South Korea, their relations both domestic and foreign, and the transformations both countries have undergone since the ... Read full review

Review: The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History (Revised and Updated Edition)

User Review  - Gloria - Goodreads

Cover: Black with huge title reminding readers that there are TWO Koreas. Cover has a narrow strip revealing somber faces, suggesting a peek into the Koreas. Ominous overall. Endorsements are by ... Read full review

Contents

Where the Wild Birds Sing
1
THE EMERGENCE OF TWO KOREAS
3
WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH
8
THE ORIGINS OF NEGOTIATION
11
KIM IL SUNG
16
CONVERSATIONS WITH THE SOUTH
23
The End of the Beginning
27
PARK CHUNG HEE
31
A VISIT TO NORTH KOREA
232
CHINA CHANGES COURSE
239
Joining the Nuclear Issue
249
THE ORIGINS OF THE NUCLEAR PROGRAM
251
THE AMERICAN WEAPONS
255
THE DECEMBER ACCORDS
260
MEETING IN NEW YORK
265
THE COMING OF THE INSPECTORS
267

WASHINGTON BLINKS AT PARKS COUP
37
THE IMPACT OF YUSHIN
41
The Trouble Deepens
47
THE STRUGGLE WITH JAPAN
51
THE UNDERGROUND WAR
56
CHALLENGE FROM THE NORTH
59
ECHOES OF SAIGON
64
THE SOUTH KOREAN NUCLEAR WEAPONS PROGRAM
68
MURDER IN THE DEMILITARIZED ZONE
74
The Carter Chill
84
ORIGINS AND IMPLEMENTATION
85
THE VIEW FROM PYONGYANG
94
END OF THE CARTER WITHDRAWAL
101
Assassination and Aftermath
109
THE COMING OF CHUN DOO HWAN
116
THE KWMNGJU UPRISING
124
THE FLIGHT TO SAVE KIM DAE JUNG
133
Terror and Talk
139
THE NEGOTIATING TRACK
144
FLOODS AND FACETOFACE TALKS
147
KIM IL SUNG AND THE SOVIET CONNECTION
153
The Battle for Democracy in Seoul
161
CHUNS SUCCESSION STRUGGLE
162
THE ELECTION OF 1987
172
The Great Olympic ComingOut Party
179
THE COMING OF THE OLYMPICS
180
THE BOMBING OF KAL FLIGHT 858
183
THE RISE OF NORDPOLITIK
186
WASHINGTON LAUNCHES A MODEST INITIATIVE
192
Moscow Switches Sides
197
THE ROOTS OF CHANGE
200
GORBACHEV MEETS ROM
204
THE SHEVARDNADZE MISSION
213
HOW LONG WILL THE RED FLAG FLY?
218
SOVIETSOUTH KOREAN ECONOMIC NEGOTIATIONS
225
China Shifts Its Ground
229
FROM ACCOMMODATION TO CRISIS
271
Withdrawal and Engagement
281
THE LIGHTWATER REACTOR PLAN
287
KIM YOUNG SAM BLOWS THE WHISTLE
291
THE SEASON OF CRISIS BEGINS
297
Showdown over Nuclear Weapons
305
THE DEFUELING CRISIS
306
THE MILITARY TRACK
311
THE DEEPENING CONFLICT
316
CARTER IN PYONGYANG
326
Death and Accord
337
THE SUCCESSION OF KIM JONG IL
345
THE FRAMEWORK NEGOTIATIONS
351
THE KIM JONG IL REGIME
359
THE STRUGGLE OVER THE REACTORS
365
North Korea in Crisis
369
POLITICAL EARTHQUAKE IN SEOUL
376
SUMMIT DIPLOMACY AND THE FOURPARTY PROPOSAL
382
THE SUBMARINE INCURSION
387
NORTH KOREAS STEEP DECLINE
393
THE PASSAGE OF HWANG JANG YOP
399
THE TWO KOREAS IN TIME OF TROUBLE
406
Turn Toward Engagement
409
INTO THE HEAVENS UNDER THE EARTH
410
TOWARD AN AIDBASED STATE
414
PERRY TO THE RESCUE
418
TOWARD THE JUNE SUMMIT
423
SUMMIT IN PYONGYANG
428
ENGAGING THE UNITED STATES
435
AFTERWORD
443
PRINCIPAL KOREAN FIGURES IN THE TEXT
447
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
451
NOTES AND SOURCES
461
INDEX
503
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Don Oberdorfer wrote for the Washington Post for twenty-five years. He was a National Book Award finalist for Tet! The Turning Point in the Vietnam War and holds a Woodrow Wilson Award from Princeton for public service. He is currently a resident scholar at Johns Hopkins University Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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