Kinship, Law and the Unexpected: Relatives are Always a Surprise (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 24, 2005 - Social Science
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How can we hold in the same view both cultural or historical constructs and generalities about social existence? Kinship, Law and the Unexpected takes up an issue at the heart of studies of society - the way we use relationships to uncover relationships. Relationality is a phenomenon at once contingent (on certain ways of knowing) and ubiquitous (to social life). The role of relations in western (Euro-American) knowledge practices, from the scientific revolution onwards, raises a question about the extent to which Euro-American kinship is the kinship of a knowledge-based society. The argument takes the reader through current issues in biotechnology, new family formations and legal interventions, and intellectual property debates, to matters of personhood and ownership afforded by material from Melanesia and elsewhere. If we are often surprised by what our relatives do, we may also be surprised by what relations tells us about the world we live in.
  

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Contents

Biotechnology in an Age of Individualism
15
2 Embedded Science
33
3 Emergent Properties
50
Part 2 the arithmetic of ownership
79
4 The Patent and the Malanggan
92
5 Losing out on Intellectual Resources
111
6 Divided Origins and the Arithmetic of Ownership
135
Notes
163
References
201
Author Index
217
Subject Index
220
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Marilyn Strathern is William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Cambridge and Mistress of Girton College, Cambridge. She has carried out fieldwork over several years in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea (Melanesia). She is the author of several works including Kinship at the Core, After Nature and Property, Substance and Effect.

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