Manual of English spelling (Google eBook)

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Page 50 - Romans I Corinthians II Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians I Thessalonians II Thessalonians I Timothy II Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews...
Page 103 - Words of one syllable or words of more than one syllable accented on the last syllable, ending in a single consonant preceded by a single vowel, double the final consonant when adding a suffix beginning with a vowel.
Page 50 - Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Songs, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zachariah, Malachi.
Page 34 - ... dominion over the fowls of the air, the beasts of the field, and the fish of the sea, including all things passing through the paths of the sea.
Page 97 - Primitive words ending in y, preceded by a consonant, change the y into i before any termination but 's, or one commencing with i ; as, merry, merrier ; pity, pitiless.
Page 110 - WORDS ENDING IN Y, PRECEDED BY A CONSONANT, change the y into i before any termination but 's, or one commencing with i ; as, merry, merrier ; pity, pitiless.
Page 155 - Haughtiness is founded on the high opinion we entertain of ourselves; disdain, on the low opinion we have of others; arrogance is the result of both, but, if anything, more of the former than the latter.
Page 50 - Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi.
Page 158 - Latin sufficient, participle of sufficio, compounded of sub andfacere, to make, signifies made or suited to the purpose. He has enough whose desires are satisfied; he has sufficient whose wants are supplied. We may therefore frequently have sufficiency when we have not enough. A greedy man is commonly in this case, who has never enough, although he has more than a sufficiency.
Page 109 - As a general rule, the plural is formed by adding s to the singular ; as, un homme (a man), des hommes (some men), une ville (a city), les villes (the cities).

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