First Annual Report on the Geology of Kansas (Google eBook)

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J. Speer, printer to the state, 1866 - Geology - 56 pages
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Page 34 - ... three-eighths of an inch in thickness. This is scraped up and used in its natural state for salting cattle, etc.; but for domestic purposes it is melted by being mixed with about twenty gallons of water to a bushel of salt, when the mechanical impurities, sand, etc., readily settle. The salt is then returned to a solid state by evaporation. The marsh after scraping, produces a second crop of salt, in from five to seven days of dry weather, and after repeated scrapings during the past three years,...
Page 56 - From its mouth west one hundred miles the fall is a little over two feet to the mile, for the second and third hundred miles about six feet to the mile, and for the last one hundred miles about seven feet to the mile, making a total rise of over two thousand feet in four hundred miles.
Page 3 - Report of the progress of the Geological Survey of the State of Virginia for the year 1840.
Page 33 - Cimmaron river. But this is situated so far from the settled portions of the State, or any regular route of transportation, that at present it is of no practical value. A railroad toward that region would make it of vast commercial importance.
Page 34 - ... changed considerably within the last 80 years is shown by a comparison of its present appearance with published descriptions given in earlier years. Mudge (1864, pp. 33-35) described this marsh as follows: The valley here is wide, gradually rising to the high prairies, so common in that part of the state. The marsh covers nearly one thousand acres, more or less impregnated with saline matter. About one-third is entirely void of vegetation, which the brine will not allow to grow. It is perfectly...
Page 34 - ... The marsh covers nearly one thousand acres, more or less impregnated with saline matter. About one-third is entirely void of vegetation, which the brine will not allow to grow. It is perfectly level, and at the time of our first visit was as white as a wintry snow-field, with a crust of crystallized salt. The marsh is of recent Alluvial formation, composed of sand and loam, from twenty to thirty feet in thickness, brought down by the wash from the high prairies, which rise gradually from three...
Page 12 - ... northern State line, and it is only in the western portions of Minnesota that these deposits are represented. No other material of our Drift is found, so near. . . . The larger stones attain the size of true boulders, being sometimes ten feet in length, and weighing ten or twelve tons. The most common are a metamorphic stratified quartzite rock. The metamorphic action has been very thorough, giving the boulders a hardness equal to common quartz, and on that account they are frequently known under...
Page 20 - Cherokee county it appears in the open prairie, where there is but little overlaying soil. This is first removed, and the mining, is in the open air. Where it is so deep beneath the surface as to require drifting, it is overlaid by shale sufficiently hard to afford a fair roofing. The last two seams are the best in quality and most persistent in thickness and uniformity of character of any in the State. These, with all the strata of the Coal Formation in Kansas, dip on an average of about three feet...
Page 34 - ... thickness, brought down by the wash from the high prairies, which rise gradually from three sides. In this alluvium, at various depths, are found the bones of buffalo, deer and antelope, which have probably made this a resort for salt for long ages past, as they are seen to do at the present time. The incrustation of salt is frequently three-eighths of an inch in thickness. This is scraped up and used in its natural state for salting cattle, etc.; but for domestic purposes it is melted by being...
Page 13 - The large boulders are found quite numerous in the Potawatomie reserve, on both sides of the Kansas, frequently numbering fifty to the acre. They lie on the tops of the bluffs and high prairies, more frequently than in the lower lands. We noticed one near Mill creek, in Wabaunsee county, on a high bluff about two hundred feet above the valley, which weighed fully eight tons. Some still larger, including one of green-stone, are to be found near Oskalooaa.

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