The British Essayists; with Prefaces, Historical and Biographical,: The Spectator (Google eBook)

Front Cover
E. Sargeant, and M. & W. Ward; and Munroe, Francis & Parker, and Edward Cotton, Boston., 1810 - English essays
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 325 - They, looking back, all the eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Waved over by that flaming brand; the gate With dreadful faces thronged and fiery arms. Some natural tears they dropped, but wiped them soon; The world was all before them, where to choose Their place of rest, and Providence their guide.
Page 290 - And another Angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the Angel's hand.
Page 99 - My beloved spake, and said unto me, Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone ; The flowers appear on the earth ; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land ; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Page 92 - What thou seest, What there thou seest, fair Creature, is thyself; With thee it came and goes : but follow me, And I will bring thee where no shadow stays Thy coming, and thy soft embraces, he Whose image thou art ; him thou shalt enjoy Inseparably thine, to him shalt bear Multitudes like thyself, and thence be call'd Mother of human race.
Page 274 - O ! why did God, Creator wise, that peopled highest Heaven With spirits masculine, create at last This novelty on Earth, this fair defect Of Nature, and not fill the world at once With men, as angels, without feminine ; Or find some other way to generate Mankind...
Page 293 - With what to sight or smell was sweet ! from thee How shall I part, and whither wander down Into a lower world ; to this obscure And wild ? how shall we breathe in other air Less pure, accustomed to immortal fruits ? Whom thus the Angel interrupted mild.
Page 149 - I was indeed very attentive to my old friend's remarks, because I looked upon them as a piece of natural criticism; and was well pleased to hear him, at the conclusion of almost every scene, telling me that he could not imagine how the play would end. One while he appeared much concerned for Andromache, and a little while after as much for Hermione; and was extremely puzzled to think what would become of Pyrrhus. When Sir Roger saw Andromache's obstinate refusal to her lover's importunities, he whispered...
Page 294 - Alas, both for the deed and for the cause ! But have I now seen death ? Is this the way I must return to native dust ? O sight Of terror, foul and ugly to behold, Horrid to think, how horrible to feel...
Page 92 - Pure as the expanse of Heaven: I thither went, With unexperienced thought, and laid me down On the green bank, to look into the clear Smooth lake, that to me seem'd another sky. As I bent down to look, just opposite A shape within the watery gleam appear'd, Bending to look on me; I started back: It started back: but pleased I soon return'd; Pleas'd it return'd as soon, with answering looks Of sympathy and love...
Page 137 - They pluck'd the seated hills with all their load, Rocks, waters, woods, and by the shaggy tops Uplifting bore them in their hands. Amaze, Be sure, and terror seized the rebel host, When coming towards them so dread they saw The bottom of the mountains upward turn'd ; Till on those cursed engines...

Bibliographic information