Minds, Brains, and Science

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Harvard University Press, 1984 - Philosophy - 107 pages
7 Reviews

Minds, Brains and Science takes up just the problems that perplex people, and it does what good philosophy always does: it dispels the illusion caused by the specious collision of truths. How do we reconcile common sense and science? Searle argues vigorously that the truths of common sense and the truths of science are both right and that the only question is how to fit them together.

Searle explains how we can reconcile an intuitive view of ourselves as conscious, free, rational agents with a universe that science tells us consists of mindless physical particles. He briskly and lucidly sets out his arguments against the familiar positions in the philosophy of mind, and details the consequences of his ideas for the mind-body problem, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, questions of action and free will, and the philosophy of the social sciences.

  

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Review: Minds, Brains and Science (1984 Reith Lectures)

User Review  - Cliff Hays - Goodreads

This book is worth it for chapter 2 alone, where the author presents his Chinese Room thought-experiment. Read full review

Review: Minds, Brains and Science (1984 Reith Lectures)

User Review  - Tim Pendry - Goodreads

Although almost thirty years old, Searle's (relatively) easy to read popular classic of analytical philosophy still stands up as a corrective to the exuberant claims of non-philosophers about the ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
CAN COMPUTERS THINK?
28
THREE
42
THE STRUCTURE OF ACTION
57
PROSPECTS FOR THE SOCIAL
71
THE FREEDOM OF THE WILL
86
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER
101
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

John Searle is Slusser Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent publications include Mind: A Brief Introduction (2004), Consciousness and Language (2002) and Rationality in Action (2001, 2003).

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