The Family Interpreted: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Family Therapy

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Basic Books, 2002 - Psychology - 349 pages
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The paradox of the contemporary family is that it is both patriarchal and father-absent. Family therapists reproduce these problems by blaming mothers, protecting fathers, ignoring issues of race and class, and settling for superficial symptom relief. In The Family Interpreted, Deborah Anna Luepnitz proposes a new practice grounded in psychoana-lytic feminism. Since its publication in 1988, this intelligent, irreverent, and incorrigibly witty book has become a classic, admired by the therapeutic community and feminist scholars. Luepnitz's work has permanently altered the debate about families, culture, and psychological change.
  

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Review: The Family Interpreted: Psychoanalysis, Feminism, And Family Therapy

User Review  - Michelle - Goodreads

The first half of this is a relatively dense, good history of family therapy, but the case studies in the second half make the whole field come alive. Read full review

Contents

III
4
IV
31
V
37
VI
49
VII
58
VIII
70
IX
76
X
89
XIII
110
XV
151
XVI
169
XVIII
202
XX
231
XXII
281
XXIV
318
XXV
330

XII
98

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Page 3 - At any rate, when a subject is highly controversial— and any question about sex is that— one cannot hope to tell the truth. One can only show how one came to hold whatever opinion one does hold.
Page vii - To be a good mother — a woman must have sense, and that independence of mind which few women possess who are taught to depend entirely on their husbands.
Page vii - As a mother, the neurotic woman who is unsatisfied by her husband is over-tender and over-anxious in regard to the child, to whom she transfers her need for love, thus awakening in it sexual precocity. The bad relations between the parents then stimulate the emotional life of the child, and cause it to experience intensities of love, hate and jealousy while yet in its infancy. The strict training which tolerates no sort of expression of this precocious sexual state lends support to the forces of...

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About the author (2002)

Deborah Anna Luepnitz, Ph.D., is on the Clinical Faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She is the author of Child Custody (l982) and The Family Interpreted (l988; revised edition, 2002) and is a contributing author to the Cambridge Companion to Lacan (forthcoming). She maintains a private practice in Philadelphia. Deborah Anna Luepnitz, Ph.D., is on the Clinical Faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She is the author of Schopenhauer's Porcupines (Basic Books, 2002). She maintains a private practice in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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