Russian: A Linguistic Introduction

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 17, 2002 - Foreign Language Study - 380 pages
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This book provides an accessible introduction to the linguistic structure of Russian, including its history, dialects and sociolinguistics, as well as the central issues of phonology, morphology, syntax and word formation/lexicology. It particularly emphasises the special linguistic features of Russian which are not shared with English and other non-Slavic languages. For intermediate/advanced students of Russian, this will help to reinforce their understanding of how all levels of Russian function. Students and scholars of linguistics will find it a useful starting point for comparative work involving the structure of Russian and the Slavic languages, or issues such as standardisation, multilingualism, and the fate of former colonial languages. Each chapter begins with an introduction to the basic theoretical concepts of the area covered, presenting the linguistic facts and relationships in an easily accessible form. It will also serve as a learning aid to Cyrillic, with all examples transliterated.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
2 Russia
3
4 Russian within linguistics
6
5 Readership
8
6 Structure and aims
9
History of the language
12
2 Linguistic features
16
21 Slavonic as an IndoEuropean dialect
17
32 The parts of the sentence
185
33 Incompleteelliptical sentences
222
34 Word order
225
4 The complex sentence
226
41 Complexcoordinate compound
228
42 Complexsubordinate complex
233
5 Reportedindirect speech
252
Wordformation and lexicology
255

22 Developments within ProtoSlavonic
18
23 Early East Slavonic developments leading to Old Russian
32
24 Developments from Old Russian to Modern Russian posttenth century
39
3 Development of the standard language
43
32 Old Russian and Old Church Slavonic
44
33 Normativising in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
47
4 Writing graphics
48
42 Orthographic principles
51
Phonology
53
2 Description
55
22 Distinctive feature description
57
3 The phonology of Modern Russian
59
32 The phonemes of Modern Russian
62
33 Distributional limitations phonotactics
73
34 The subsystems of foreign words and abbreviations
83
35 Morphophonology
86
36 Sentence intonation
89
37 Style in phonology
92
4 Graphics
95
43 Orthographic principles
98
45 Major steps in the history of the graphic system
99
Morphology
102
12 Russian morphemes
105
2 The morphology of Modern Russian
108
22 Verbal
146
23 Other categories
169
Syntax
176
12 Sentence structure and analysis
177
2 Nominal phrases
178
3 Simple sentence
181
31 Features of the main types of simple sentence
183
12 Stem
256
13 Analysis and the role of etymology
257
22 Internal sources
261
3 Morphophonology in wordformation
274
32 Consonants
276
33 Stress
278
41 Prefixes
279
42 Suffixes
287
5 Lexicology and phraseology
306
52 Phrases
309
Dialects
313
2 Historical orientation
314
3 Linguistic features
316
32 Morphology
324
33 Syntax
328
Sociolinguistics
332
21 Russian Church Slavonic
333
23 Lowstyle
334
25 The Academy
335
32 Current developments Contemporary Standard Russian
336
33 Phonological
338
34 Morphological
342
35 Wordformational
349
4 Contactinterference
350
42 PostSoviet period
351
43 Diaspora
352
5 Pragmatics
354
Bibliography
363
II References
367
Index
373
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Paul Cubberley was Senior Research Fellow in Linguistics at the University of Melbourne until 2001.

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