Shame: A Novel

Front Cover
Macmillan, Dec 1, 2000 - Fiction - 320 pages
4 Reviews
Winner of the French Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger

In his brilliant third novel, first published in 1983, Salman Rushdie gives us a lively and colorful mixture of history, art, language, politics, and religion. Set in a country "not quite Pakistan," the story centers around the family of two men—one a celebrated warrior, the other a debauched playboy—engaged in a protracted duel that is played out in the political landscape of their country.
  

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Review: Shame

User Review  - Ellery - Goodreads

All the characters seem to loiter at the precipice of the event horizon gradually being pulled towards the singularity of fate. It had this really nice sense of cliched destiny and of 'balance' being ... Read full review

Review: Shame

User Review  - Holly - Goodreads

This book follows several characters and generations whose lives intertwine in mid-twentieth century Pakistan. It took me a while to get into this book; the first couple of chapters were pretty slow ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

ESCAPES FROM THE MOTHER COUNTRY
1
The DumbWaiter
3
A Necklace of Shoes
19
Melting Ice
39
THE DUELLISTS
53
Behind the Screen
55
The Wrong Miracle
69
Affairs of Honour
90
Beauty and the Beast
151
IN THE FIFTEENTH CENTURY
183
Alexander the Great
185
The Woman in the Veil
207
Monologue of a Hanged Man
233
Stability
254
JUDGMENT DAY
281
Acknowledgments
307

SHAME GOOD NEWS AND THE VIRGIN
115
Blushing
117

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References to this book

Salman Rushdie
Catherine Cundy
Limited preview - 1996
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About the author (2000)

Salman Rushdie is the author of seven novels: Grimus, Midnight's Children, Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, and one work of short stories titled East, West. He has also published four works of nonfiction: The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary Homelands, The Wizard of Oz, and Mirrorwork (co-edited with Elizabeth West).

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