The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus (Google eBook)

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J. M. Dent & sons, Limited, 1897 - English drama - 111 pages
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My British Literature teacher made it sound awesome.
We shall see.

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Page 84 - Her lips suck forth my soul: see, where it flies! Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again. Here will I dwell, for heaven is in these lips, And all is dross that is not Helena.
Page 14 - Why this is hell, nor am I out of it : Think'st thou that I who saw the face of God, And tasted the eternal joys of Heaven, Am not tormented with ten thousand hells, In being deprived of everlasting bliss ? O Faustus!
Page 4 - If we say that we have no sin we deceive ourselves, and there's no truth in us. Why, then, belike we must sin, and so consequently die. Ay, we must die an everlasting death. What doctrine call you this, Che sera sera, What will be, shall be?
Page 21 - Lo, Mephistophilis, for love of thee, I cut mine arm, and with my proper blood Assure my soul to be great Lucifer's, Chief lord and regent of perpetual night ! View here the blood that trickles from mine arm, And let it be propitious for my wish.
Page 92 - O, no end is limited to damned souls. Why wert thou not a creature wanting soul? Or, why is this immortal that thou hast? Ah, Pythagoras' metempsychosis, were that true, This soul should fly from me, and I be changed Unto some brutish beast.
Page 93 - O, it strikes, it strikes! Now, body, turn to air, Or Lucifer will bear thee quick to hell. (Thunder and lightning. O soul, be changed into little water-drops, And fall into the ocean- ne'er be found.
Page 7 - Almain rutters with their horsemen's staves Or Lapland giants, trotting by our sides ; Sometimes like women or unwedded maids, Shadowing more beauty in their airy brows Than have the white breasts of the queen of love : From Venice shall they drag huge argosies, And from America the golden fleece That yearly stuffs old Philip's treasury; If learned Faustus will be resolute.
Page 94 - That sometime grew within this learned man. Faustus is gone: regard his hellish fall, Whose fiendful fortune may exhort the wise Only to wonder at unlawful things. Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practice more than heavenly power permits.
Page 19 - Abjure this magic, turn to God again !" Ay, and Faustus will turn to God again. To God? He loves thee not The God thou serv'st is thine own appetite, Wherein is...
Page 85 - O, thou art fairer than the evening air Clad in the beauty of a thousand stars; Brighter art thou than flaming Jupiter When he appeared to hapless Semele: More lovely than the monarch of the sky In wanton Arethusa's azured arms : And none but thou shalt be my paramour!

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