Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving in, Issue 4

Front Cover
Penguin, 1991 - Business & Economics - 200 pages
40 Reviews
"Getting to Yes" offers a concise, step-by-step, proven strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict--whether it involves parents and children, neighbors, bosses and employees, customers or corporations, tenants or diplomats. Based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals continually with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution from domestic to business to international, "Getting to Yes" tells you how to:
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jasonli - LibraryThing

More than three decades after its initial publication, "Getting to Yes" is a classic in transactional negotiations of all sorts, whether it be business or political. Despite being a product of the ... Read full review

Review: Getting to Yes: Negotiating an Agreement Without Giving In

User Review  - Justangie88 - Goodreads

I had to read this for a negotiations class I took, and it was a great read. The material is not difficult to get through, and they break down the process in an accessible way. It's information you ... Read full review

Contents

THE PROBLEM
1
Dont Bargain Over Positions
3
THE METHOD
15
Separate the PEOPLE from the Problem
17
Focus on INTEREST Not Positions
40
4 Invent OPTIONS for Mutual Gain
56
5 Insist on Using Objective CRITERIA
81
YES BUT
95
What If They Are More Powerful? Develop Your BATNABest Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement
97
What If They Wont Play? Use Negotiation Jujitsu
107
What If They Use Dirty Tricks? Taming the Hard Bargainer
129
IN CONCLUSION
145
TEN QUESTIONS PEOPLE ASK ABOUT GETTING TO YES
149
Analytical table of Contents
189
A Note on the Harvard Negotiation Project
199
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor Emeritus of Law at Harvard, director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, and founder of two consulting organizations.
Daniel Shapiro, associate director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, teaches at Harvard Law School and in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School.

William Ury is the co-founder of Harvard's Program on Negotiation, where he directs the Project on Preventing War. One of the world's leading negotiation specialists, his past clients include dozens of Fortune 500 companies as well as the White House and Pentagon. Ury received his B.A. from Yale and a Ph.D. in Anthropology from Harvard. His books Getting to YES and Getting Past No have sold more than five million copies worldwide. He lives in Boulder, Colorado.

Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, and Sheila Heen teach at the Harvard Law School and the Harvard Negotiation Project, the group that produced the international bestseller "Getting to YES!" They have consulted to businesspeople, governments, organizations, communities, and individuals around the world, from the various parties to the negotiations on constitutional transition in South Africa to schoolteachers in Medellin, Colombia, to community leaders and the police department in Springfield, Massachusetts. They have written on negotiation and communications in publications ranging from "The New York Times" to "Parents" magazine. Bruce Patton is also coauthor of "Getting to YES!

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