Death and the Disinterested Spectator: An Inquiry into the Nature of Philosophy

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SUNY Press, 1986 - Philosophy - 262 pages
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Death and the Disinterested Spectator examines the nature of philosophy in light of philosophy's claim to be a preparation for death. Does philosophy have any real power, or is it merely idle talk? The background against which this question is explored is a re-interpretation of Plato's Phaedo, Augustine's Confessions, and Descartes' Discourse on Method.
  

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Contents

Socrates Penelope and the Bee
11
Comedy Tragedy Philosophy
12
Actor or Spectator
26
Hubris and Irony
36
Truth and Deception
44
B Phaedo
78
C Plato
81
From Philosophical Courage to Christian Hope
83
Actor or Spectator
153
Pride and Humility
173
Truth and Certitude
179
Transition and Return
189
Conclusion Death and the Disinterested Spectator
191
Wonder and Death
194
The Strange and the Familiar
197
The Fable of Certitude
201

St Augustine The Look of Pity
85
Laughter Tears Trembling and Wonder
87
Actor or Spectator
101
Pride and Humility
114
Truth and SelfDeception
122
From Christian Hope to Modern Certitude
135
Descartes Occupation and Preoccupation
137
Laughter Tears Trembling and Wonder
144
From Disinterested Spectator to Compassionate Actor
203
Cartesian Presumption Socratic Victory
208
Idle Talk and Endless Toil
212
Weaving the Shroud
217
Notes
221
Works Consulted
253
Index
259
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Ann Hartle is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Emory University.

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