The Washo Indians, by S. A. Barrett (Google eBook)

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order of the Trustees, 1917 - Washo Indians - 52 pages
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Page 5 - ... STATES. from 30 to 40 miles broad. To the east is the great Amargosa plain, and to the west the Panamint valley. The district is a part of the Great Basin region, with its myriads of short, lofty mountain ranges, separated from one another by broad plain-like valleys. In this vast region, stretching from the Wasatch range on the east to the Sierra Nevada on the west, are found some of the most remarkable geographic features on the face of the globe. The Sierra Nevada, rising from 10,000 to 14,000...
Page 5 - Kaibab reservations and vicinity. The term Plateau culture area has been hitherto applied to this region, but In view of the fact that the term is, from a standpoint of physiography, a misnomer, and that the term Great Basin, is generally accepted as the name for this physiographic division of the continent, it seems best to adopt it for anthropology as well. Especially is this advisable since the name Is so perfectly descriptive of this region and since the cultural limits of Its inhabitants so...
Page 5 - Shivwlts, and Kaibab reservations and vicinity. The term Plateau culture area has been hitherto applied to this region, but In view of the fact that the term is, from a standpoint of physiography, a misnomer, and that the term Great Basin, is generally accepted as the name for this physiographic division of the continent, it seems best to adopt it for anthropology as well. Especially is this advisable since the name Is so perfectly descriptive...
Page 6 - Map 1. Showing the Washo territory and that of surrounding tribes. sequoia and the oak, whose acorns are used to some extent as food; thus introducing here a distinctly Californian element. The fauna of the two sections presented, in primitive times, similar differences. That of the arid region...
Page 50 - HARVESTING BASKETS. Figure 1. Coarsely woven burden basket used especially for gathering pine cones. Catalog number 18323. Length 16.5 inches (42 cm.). Figure 2. Seed beater. Catalog number 18316. Length 20.8 inches (53 cm.). Figure 3. Finely woven diagonal-twined burden basket. Catalog number 18321.
Page 20 - ... burden basket, where a difference in technic or in fineness of weave and the resultant difference in use in each case calls for a special name. Basket tsina'm Burden baskets Coarsely woven, plain-twined technic mama'i Plate XIII, fig. 6. Coarsely woven, diagonal-twined technic tatuba'buli Plate XIII, figs.
Page 17 - Cercis occidentalis, the bark of which furnishes a red element. This is obtained from the Miwok to the west as it is not an indigenous shrub to the Washo country, and is therefore sparingly used. The following tabulation gives the Washo names of these various materials : Willow hi'mu Unpeeled rods mi'mu Peeled rods agaiye'we...
Page 23 - Practically any triangular design is referred to as "arrow-head", (matca'ti). The arrow-head design may be combined into a number of different, more complex figures. The simplest form of arrowhead design is a series of triangles such as is shown in figs. 8 and 9, and called respectively matca'tl eti, "arrow-head down", and matca'tl epus, "arrow-head up".
Page 16 - BASKETRY. The Washo are quite justly renowned as makers of fine, coiled basketry. Certain of the Washo women make very smooth and excellent baskets and employ a great variety of designs. In many respects the basketry of the Washo closely resembles that of the Miwok to the west. Particularly is this...
Page 4 - INTRODUCTION. The Washo Indians constitute a small group forming a distinct linguistic family and occupying a very small territory in the Sierra Nevada, bordering Lake Tahoe, and on the upper courses of the Carson and Truckee rivers. While prosecuting field work for the...