A catalogue of the royal and noble authors of England, Scotland, and Ireland: with lists of their works, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Printed for J. Scott, 1806 - English literature
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Page 99 - I, that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks, like a nymph, sometimes sitting in the shade like a goddess, sometimes singing like an angel, sometimes playing like Orpheus ; behold the sorrow of this world ! once amiss hath bereaved me of all.
Page 345 - ... who bequeathed love and peace to his disciples, I cannot call to mind where I have read or heard words more mild and peaceful. He there exhorts us to hear with patience and humility those, however they be...
Page 208 - No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He commanded where he spoke, and had his judges angry and pleased at his devotion. No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end.
Page 253 - He indulged to himself the pleasures of all kinds, almost in all excesses. To women, whether out of his natural constitution, or for want of his domestic content and delight (in which he was most unhappy, for he paid much too dear for his wife's fortune by taking her person into the bargain) he was immoderately given up...
Page 221 - When we, at this distance of time, inquire what prodigious merits excited such admiration, what do we find? Great valour. But it was an age of heroes. In full of all other talents, we have a tedious, lamentable, pedantic, pastoral romance, which the patience of a young virgin in love cannot now wade through...
Page 345 - He writing of Episcopacy and by the way treating of sects and schisms, left ye his vote, or rather now the...
Page 31 - Full oft within the spacious walls, When he had fifty winters o'er him, My grave Lord-Keeper led the brawls ; The seals and maces danc'd before him. His bushy beard, and shoe-strings green, His high-crown'd hat and satin doublet, Mov'd the stout heart of England's Queen, Though Pope and Spaniard could not trouble it.
Page 246 - Bacon ; to which is added A Relation of the STATE of France, with the CHARACTERS of Henry IV. and the principal persons of that Court...
Page 313 - ... without making desperate sallies against growing mischiefs, which he knew well he had no power to hinder, and which might probably begin in his own ruin. To conclude, his security consisted very much in his having but little credit with the King; and he died in a season most opportune, in which a wise man would have prayed to have finished his course, and which in truth crowned his other signal prosperity in the world.
Page 206 - God thou wert, and art, and still shall be ; The line of time, it doth not measure thee. Both death and life obey thy holy lore, And visit in their turns, as they are sent; A thousand years with thee they are no more Than yesterday, which, ere it is, is spent: Or as a watch by night, that course doth keep...

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