The Works of John Locke, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

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Thomas Tegg, 1823 - Philosophy
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Page 6 - A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world ; he that has these two has little more to wish for; and he that wants either of them will be but little the better for anything else.
Page 132 - Wisdom I take, in the popular acceptation, for a man's managing his business ably, and with foresight, in this world. This is the product of a good natural temper, application of mind and experience together, and so above the reach \ of children. The...
Page 69 - It will perhaps be wondered that I mention reasoning with children; and yet I cannot but think that the true way of dealing with them. They understand it as early as they do language; and, if I misobserve not, they love to be treated as rational creatures sooner than is imagined.
Page 181 - If any one among us have a facility or purity more than ordinary in his mother tongue, it is owing to chance, or his genius, or any thing, rather than to his education or any care of his teacher.
Page 282 - God forbid that I should justify you : Till I die I will not remove mine integrity from me. My righteousness I hold fast, and will not let it go : My heart shall not reproach me so long as I live.
Page 152 - Can there be any thing more ridiculous, than that a father should waste his own money, and his son's time, in setting him to learn the Roman language, when, at the same time, he designs him for a trade, wherein he, having no use of...
Page 112 - ... or benign to those of their own kind. Our practice takes notice of this in the exclusion of butchers from juries of life and death. Children should from the beginning be bred up in an abhorrence of killing or tormenting any living creature ; and be taught not to spoil or destroy any thing, unless it be for the preservation or advantage of some other that is nobler.
Page 6 - I think I may say, that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education.
Page 61 - None of the things they are Taslc to learn should ever be made a burden to them, or imposed on them as a task. Whatever is so proposed presently becomes irksome : the mind takes an aversion to it, though before it were a thing of delight or indifferency.
Page 311 - Suppose a man born blind, and now adult, and taught by his touch to distinguish between a cube and a sphere of the same metal, and nighly of the same bigness, so as to tell, when he felt one and the other, which is the cube, which the sphere.

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