Original letters, written during the reigns of Henry VI., Edward IV., and Richard III. by various persons of rank or consequence: containing many curious anecdotes, relative to that period of our history (Google eBook)

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Printed for G. G. J. and J. Robinson, 1787 - Great Britain
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Page 211 - I trust it shall be better in time coming. No more to you at this time, but the Holy Trinity have you in keeping ; and I beseech you that this bill be not seen of none earthly creature save only yourself, &c.
Page 207 - Thanking you heartily for the great cheer ye made me, and all my Folks, the last time that I was at Norwich ; and ye promised me, that ye would never break the matter to Margery unto such time, as ye and I were at a point.
Page 211 - I would not forsake you. And if ye command me to keep me true wherever I go. I wis I will do all my might you to love, and never no mo.
Page 101 - Sir,I recommend me to you, letting you weet, that your desire, as for the Knights of the Shire, was an impossible (thing) to be brought about; for my Lord of Norfolk and my Lord of Suffolk were agreed, more than a fortnight ago, to have Sir Robert Wyngfield, and Sir Richard Harcourt, and that knew I not till Friday last past.
Page 5 - Goldsmiths work might make them ; for of such Gear, and Gold, and Pearl, and Stones, they of the Duke's Court, neither Gentlemen nor Gentlewomen, they want none ; for without that they have it by wishes, by my truth, I heard never of so great plenty as here is.
Page 211 - And my lady my mother hath laboured the matter to my father full diligently, but she can no more get than ye know of, for the which God knoweth I am full sorry. But if that ye love me, as I trust verily that ye do, ye will not leave me therefore ; for if that ye had not half the livelihood that ye have, for to do the greatest labour that any woman alive might, I would not forsake you.
Page 221 - I shall have to my mother-in-law if the matter take; nor yet a kinder father-in-law than I shall have, though he be hard to me as yet. All the circumstances of the matter, which I trust to tell you at your coming to Norwich, could not be written in three leaves of paper, and ye know my lewd (poor ) head well enough, I may not write long, wherefore I fery over all things till I may await on you myself.
Page 215 - Wherefore, if that ye could be content with that Good, and my poor Person, I would be the merriest maiden on ground ; and if ye think not yourself so satisfied, or that ye might have much more Good, as I have understood by you afore ; good, true, and loving Valentine, that ye take no such labour upon you, as to come more for that matter, But let...
Page 209 - Valentine, I recommend me unto you, full heartily desiring to hear of your welfare, which I beseech Almighty God long for to preserve unto his pleasure and your heart's desire. And if it please you to hear of my welfare, I am not in good heele...
Page 7 - God made never a more worshipful knight. And as for the Duke's court, as of lords, ladies, and gentlewomen, knights, esquires, and gentlemen, I heard never of none like to it, save King Arthur's court.