Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism

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Brooke Holmes, W. H. Shearin
Oxford University Press, May 8, 2012 - History - 383 pages
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Dynamic Reading examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, which range chronologically from the latter days of the Roman Republic to late twentieth-century France and America. Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. Whether it helps us to characterize the "swerviness" of literary influence, the transformative effects of philosophy, or the "events" that shape history, Epicureanism has been a dynamic force in the intellectual history of the West. These essays seek to capture some of that dynamism.
  

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Contents

Swerves Events and Unexpected Effects
3
Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death
30
Pleasure Authority and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic
52
Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius
89
Epicurus and Lucretius in SixteenthCentury England
113
Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau
133
La Mettrie Materialist Physiology and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic
162
The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin
199
8 The Sublime Today?
239
Leo Strausss History of Modern Epicureanism
267
10 Epicurean Presences in Foucaults The Hermeneutics of the Subject
303
11 Deleuze Lucretius and the Simulacrum of Naturalism
316
Bibliography
343
Index
367
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About the author (2012)


Brooke Holmes is Assistant Professor of Classics at Princeton University.

W. H. Shearin is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Miami.

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