Torture as public policy: restoring U.S. credibility on the world stage

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Paradigm Publishers, 2010 - History - 210 pages
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After September 11, 2001 the Bush Administration decided that the most important intelligence about terrorism would come from the interrogation of captives suspected of terrorism. As a result, many detainees were subject to harsh interrogation techniques that at times amounted to torture. Here, James P. Pfiffner authoritatively examines the policy directives, operational decisions, and leadership actions of the Bush Administration that reversed centuries of U.S. policy on the treatment of enemy prisoners. He shows how the serious reservations of career military lawyers about these policies were overcome by the political appointees of the Bush Administration. Pfiffner then analyzes the philosophical and legal underpinnings of the policies and practices that have led to the denunciation of the United States' policies by its allies and adversaries throughout the world. Looking ahead, Pfiffner anticipates Obama administration policy changes to restore U.S. credibility and accountability. In all, Torture as Public Policyis a model of detailed policy analysis that demonstrates how greatly public policy matters beyond the back corridors of bureaucracy.

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Review: Torture as Public Policy: Restoring US Credibility on the World Stage

User Review  - Steven Peterson - Goodreads

This is a reasonably work on torture and the implications for countries that allow it to take place. The focus is American policy that has approved of torture in the near past. Pfiffner has a very ... Read full review

Contents

Policymaking on Torture
13
The Implementation of Policy
45
Moral and Behavioral Issues
83
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (2010)

James P. Pfiffner is a University Professor in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University. He has also taught at the University of California, Riverside and California State University, Fullerton. He has written or edited ten books on the presidency, including THE STRATEGIC PRESIDENCY: HITTING THE GROUND RUNNING, 2nd Edition ( 1996) and THE CHARACTER FACTOR: HOW WE JUDGE AMERICA'S PRESIDENTS (2004). He has also published more than 80 articles and book chapters on the presidency, American government, and public management. As an elected member of the National Academy of Public Administration, he has been a panel member or on project staffs of the National Commission on the Public Service (the Volcker Commission), the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Center for the Study of the Presidency.