The History of Londonderry, Comprising the Towns of Derry and Londonderry, N. H. (Google eBook)

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Perkins and Whipple, 1851 - Derry (N.H.) - 358 pages
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Page 4 - ... an overruling Providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him, to serve him, to enjoy him, was with them the great end of existence. They rejected with contempt the ceremonious homage which other sects substituted for the pure worship of the soul. Instead of catching occasional glimpses of the Deity through an obscuring veil, they aspired to gaze full on the intolerable...
Page 4 - The intensity of their feelings on one subject made them tranquil on every other. One overpowering sentiment had subjected to itself pity and hatred, ambition and fear. Death had lost its terrors and pleasure its charms. They had their smiles and their tears, their raptures and their sorrows, but not for the things of this world.
Page 34 - For wherein shall it be known here that I and thy people have found grace in thy sight? is it not in that thou goest with us? so shall we be separated, I and thy people, from all the people that are upon the face of the earth.
Page 129 - Moreover, I will make a covenant of peace with them; it shall be an everlasting covenant with them, and I will place them, and multiply them, and will set my sanctuary in the midst of them for evermore.
Page 4 - The Puritans were men whose minds had derived a peculiar character from the daily contemplation of superior beings and eternal interests. Not content with acknowledging, in general terms, an overruling Providence, they habitually ascribed every event to the will of the Great Being, for whose power nothing was too vast, for whose inspection nothing was too minute. To know him, to serve him, to enjoy him, was with them...
Page 166 - Lord, make me to know mine end, and the measure of my days, what it is; that I may know how frail I am.
Page 1 - Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations : ask thy father, and he will show thee ; thy elders, and they will tell thee.
Page 335 - We the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage, and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our Power, at the Risque of our Lives and Fortunes, with ARMS oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets and Armies against the United American COLONIES.
Page 38 - If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning ! If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth ; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy...
Page 40 - And a man shall be as an hiding place from the wind, and a covert from the tempest ; as rivers of water in a dry place, as the shadow of a great rock in a weary land.

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