Russia: The Roots of Confrontation

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1985 - History - 411 pages
0 Reviews

Robert V. Daniels' book Russia: The Roots of Confrontation, first published in 1985, examines the historical contrasts between East and West and elucidates the Russian enigma. The book springs from the thesis that Russia's national character and its international relations can be understood only in light of the traumas and triumphs, privation and privileges that the country weathered in its unique past under the tsars and the Soviets. The author lays to rest the mistaken American view that Soviet behavior was simply the application of Marxist revolutionary ideology. The character of the Soviet system as it evolved after the Revolution is shown to be a synthesis of revolutionary rhetoric, dictatorial pragmatism, and traditional Russian kinds of behavior. Daniels points out that no part of the world is more alien to Americans than Russia, and he evokes parallels and contrasts with the American experience to clarify the driving forces behind this ill-understood superpower.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Past in the Present
1
Holy Russia
25
Imperial Power
53
The Road to Catastrophe
61
America and the Peoples of Russia
70
Modernization and Revolution
77
Marxism in Russia
84
War Intervention and International Revolution
119
Isolation and Alliance
191
Cold War and Coexistence
213
Containment
228
From Freeze to Thaw
241
From Coexistence to Polycentrism
250
The Contemporary System
259
Soviet Life and Culture
301
The Soviet Union and the World
321

Russia Leaves the War
126
Allied Intervention
135
World Revolution
143
The Evolution of the Soviet Regime
151
Confrontation or Accommodation?
357
Suggested Readings
371
Index
397
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1985)

Robert V. Daniels is Professor of History, Emeritus, University of Vermont.

Bibliographic information