Perspectival Thinking: For Inquiring Organisations (Google eBook)

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Informing Science, 2000 - Computer science - 243 pages
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Contents

II
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III
6
IV
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V
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VI
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VII
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VIII
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IX
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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L
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LVI
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LVII
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LVIII
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LX
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LXII
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LXIII
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVII
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LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
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LXXII
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LXXIII
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Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 70 - tis not to come ; if it be not to come, it will be now ; if it be not now, yet it will come ; the readiness is all ; since no man has aught of what he leaves, what is't to leave betimes?
Page 104 - The test of a round character is whether it is capable of surprising in a convincing way. If it never surprises, it is flat. If it does not convince, it is a flat pretending to be round.
Page 144 - My main task has been to show that there is a deep and important underlying structural correspondence between the pattern of a problem and the process of designing a physical form which answers that problem.
Page 53 - It is a commonplace that all research must start from a problem. Research can be successful only if the problem is good; it can be original only if the problem is original. But how can one see a problem, any problem, let alone a good and original problem? For to see a problem is to see something that is hidden. It is to have an intimation of the coherence of hitherto not comprehended particulars.
Page 130 - The picture which holds traditional philosophy captive is that of the mind as a great mirror, containing various representations — some accurate, some not — and capable of being studied by pure, nonempirical methods.
Page 42 - Holderlin and the Essence of Poetry. Again : 'Obedience to the voice of Being, thought seeks the Word through which the truth of Being may be expressed. . . .Out of longguarded speechlessness and the 'careful clarification of the field thus cleared, comes the utterance of the thinker. Of like origin is the naming of the poet.
Page 54 - This then is our liberation from objectivism: to realize that we can voice our ultimate convictions only from within our convictions — from within the whole system of acceptances that are logically prior to any particular assertion of our own, prior to the holding of any particular piece of knowledge.
Page 149 - We know a person's face, and can recognize it among a thousand, indeed among a million. Yet we usually cannot tell how we recognize a face we know. So most of this knowledge cannot be put into words.
Page 105 - The traditional notion of representation assumes that mimesis entails reference to a pregiven 'reality' that is meant to be represented in the text." However, Iser asserts that "there has been a clearly discernible tendency toward privileging the performative aspect of the author-text-reader relationship, whereby the pre-given is no longer viewed as an object of representation but rather as material from which something new is fashioned.
Page 149 - I shall consider human knowledge by starting from the fact that we can know more than we can tell.

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