Literary Pamphlets Chiefly Relating to Poetry from Sidney to Byron, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner, 1897 - English literature
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Page 93 - ... cometh to you with words set in delightful proportion, either accompanied with, or prepared for, the well-enchanting skill of music; and with a tale, forsooth, he cometh unto you, with a tale which holdeth children from play and old men from the chimney corner...
Page 149 - Momus of poetry; then, though I will not wish unto you the ass's ears of Midas, nor to be driven by a poet's verses, as Bubonax was, to hang himself; nor to be rhymed to death, as is said to be done in Ireland; yet thus much curse I must send you...
Page 73 - I speak to show that it is not riming and versing that maketh a poet — no more than a long gown maketh an advocate, who, though he pleaded in armor, should be an advocate and no soldier...
Page 72 - For these third be they which most properly do imitate to teach and delight; and to imitate borrow nothing of what is, hath been, or shall be ; but range, only reined with learned discretion, into the divine consideration of what may be and should be.
Page 59 - And first, truly, to all them that professing learning inveigh against Poetry may justly be objected, that they go very near to ungratefulness, to seek to deface that which, in the noblest nations and languages that are known, hath been the first light-giver to ignorance, and first nurse, whose milk by little and little enabled them to feed afterwards of tougher knowledges.
Page 31 - ... disposal of him, his life had been no longer than that of one of his poems, the life of half a day. Let the person of a gentleman of his parts be never so contemptible, his inward man is ten times more ridiculous ; it being impossible that his outward form, though it be that of a downright monkey, should differ so much from human shape, as his unthinking, immaterial part does from human understanding.
Page 143 - I do not doubt, when Antonius and Crassus, the great forefathers of Cicero in eloquence, the one (as Cicero testifieth of them) pretended not to know...
Page 146 - masculine rhyme," but still in the next to the last, which the French call the "female," or the next before that, which the Italians term sdrucciola. The example of the former is buono: suono, of the sdrucciola, femina: semina.
Page 65 - Psalms will speak for me, which, being interpreted, is nothing but Songs : then, that it is fully written in metre, as all learned Hebricians agree, although the rules be not yet fully found.
Page 113 - Now, for the poet, he nothing^ affirms and therefore never lieth. For as I take it, to lie is to affirm That to be true which is false. So as the other artists, and especially the historian, affirming many things, can in the cloudy knowledge of mankind hardly escape from many lies. But the poet, as I said before, never affirmeth. The poet never maketh any circles about your imagination, to conjure you to believe for true what he writes.

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