The steam engine familiarly explained and illustrated: with an historical sketch of its invention and progesssive improvement; its application to navigation and railways; with plain maxims for railway speculators (Google eBook)

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Printed for Taylor and Walton, 1836 - Steam-engines - 391 pages
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Page 43 - A small quantity which remained in the flask began to boil and steam issued from its mouth. It occurred to him to try what effect would be produced by inverting the flask and plunging its mouth in the cold water.
Page 37 - ... which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of...
Page 37 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough...
Page 38 - I have seen the water run like a constant fountain stream forty feet high. One vessel of water rarefied by fire driveth up forty of cold water ; and a man that tends the work is but to turn two cocks, that, one vessel of water being consumed, another begins to force and refill with cold water, and so successively, the fire being tended and kept constant, which the...
Page 178 - ... surround and intersect these islands, was regarded as the dream of enthusiasts. Nautical men and men of science rejected such speculations with equal incredulity, and with little less than scorn for the understanding of those who could for a moment entertain them. Yet we have witnessed...
Page 38 - One vessel of water rarefied by fire driveth up forty of cold water, and a man that tends the work has but to turn two cocks; that one vessel of water being consumed, another begins to force and refill with cold water, and so successively; the fire being tended and kept constant, which the self-same person may likewise abundantly perform in the interim between the necessity of turning the said cocks.
Page 208 - Manchester, 30 miles in 2 hours and 40 minutes, exclusive of delays upon the road for watering, &c., being at the rate of nearly 12 miles an hour. The speed varied according to the inclinations of the road. Upon a level it was 12 miles an hour ; upon a descent of 6 feet in a mile, it was 16 miles an hour; upon a rise of 8 feet in a mile it was about 9 miles an hour. The weather was calm, the rails very wet, but the wheels did not slip, even in the slowest speed, except at starting, the rails being...
Page 41 - I have thought that it would not be difficult to work machines in which, by means of a moderate heat and at a small cost, water might produce that perfect vacuum which has vainly been sought by means of gunpowder.
Page 37 - ... so that they are strengthened by the force within them, and the one to fill after the other. I have seen the water run like a constant fountain-stream forty feet high ; one vessel of •water rarified by fire, driveth up forty of cold water.
Page 80 - Unfortunately for me," says Watt in a letter to Dr. Brewster, " the necessary avocations' of my business prevented me from attending his or any other lectures at college. In further noticing Dr. Black's opinion, that his fortunate observation of what happens in the formation and condensation of elastic vapour 'has contributed in no inconsiderable degree to the ' public good, by suggesting to my friend Mr. Watt of Birmingham, then of Glasgow, his improvements on the steam-engine...

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