Walker Evans

Front Cover
Aperture Foundation, 1993 - Photography - 96 pages
4 Reviews
Walker Evans, more than any other photographer in the thirties and forties, defined the documentary aesthetic. For over four decades he used his camera precisely and lucidly to record the American experience. He is generally acknowledged as America's finest documentary photographer of this century. He attempted to show both the beauty of his subjects and the horror of the social conditions in which they lived. During the Depression, from 1935 to 1937, Evans took part in the most extensive photographic project ever carried out in the United States - the pictorial survey of the Farm Security Administration. The now-legendary collaboration with James Agee that resulted in the masterpiece Let Us Now Praise Famous Men documents his dedication to photographing the country he knew. Evans's talented eye and sensitive heart make him one of the great photographers of this century. This volume contains many of his best-known images.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Walker Evans

User Review  - Bader - Goodreads

Walker Evans was trying "to treat the photographic medium like a work of literature." He certainly succeeded in doing so. Read full review

Review: Walker Evans: Masters of Photography

User Review  - Bicycle - Goodreads

Some great documents of american history! Read full review

Related books

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3

1 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1993)

More than any other artist, Walker Evans (1903-1975) invented the image of essential America that we have long since accepted as fact. Evans did most of his best work in the 1930s, and his pictures have been celebrated as documents of the Great Depression. But his concerns ranged far beyond the troubles of the 1930s, and his work has made its impact not only on photography but also on modern literature, film and the traditional visual arts.