The Rambler, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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W. Suttaby, 1809 - English essays
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Page 91 - The gates of hell are open night and day ; Smooth the descent, and easy is the way : But, to return, and view the cheerful skies In this the task and mighty labour lies.
Page 45 - Evil into the mind of God or man May come and go, so unapproved, and leave No spot or blame behind...
Page 208 - Not only the images of rural life, but the occasions on which they can be properly produced, are few and general. The state of a man confined to the employments and pleasures of the country, is so little diversified, and exposed to so few of those accidents which produce perplexities, terrors and surprises, in more complicated transactions, that he can be shewn but seldom in such circumstances as attract curiosity.
Page 211 - If we search the writings of Virgil for the true definition of a pastoral, it will be found a poem in which any action or passion is represented by its effects upon a country life.
Page 21 - The purpose of these writings is surely not only to show mankind but to provide that they may be seen hereafter with less hazard: to teach the means of avoiding the snares which are laid by treachery for innocence without...
Page 22 - Many writers, for the sake of following nature, so mingle good and bad qualities in their principal personages, that they are both equally conspicuous ; and as we accompany them through their adventures with delight, and are led by degrees to interest ourselves in their favour, we lose the abhorrence of their faults, because they do not hinder our pleasure, or, perhaps, regard them with some kindness, for being united with so much merit.
Page 247 - If a man was to compare the effect of a single stroke of the pick-ax, or of one impression of the spade, with the general design and last result, he would be overwhelmed by the sense of their disproportion ; yet those petty operations, incessantly continued, in time surmount the greatest difficulties, and mountains are levelled, and oceans bounded, by the slender force of human beings.
Page 307 - ... the active, and elevation to the eminent, all that sparkles in the eye of hope, and pants in the bosom of suspicion, at once became dust in the balance, without weight and without regard. Riches, authority, and praise, lose all their influence when they are considered as riches which to-morrow shall be bestowed upon another, authority which shall this night expire for ever, and praise which, however merited, or however sincere, shall, after a few moments, be heard no more.
Page 27 - A man that has formed this habit of turning every new object to his entertainment, finds in the productions of nature an inexhaustible stock of materials upon which he can employ himself without any temptations to envy or malevolence ; faults, perhaps, seldom totally avoided by those, whose judgment is much exercised upon the works of art.
Page 8 - This quality of looking forward into fulurity seems the unavoidable condition of a being, whose motions are gradual, and whose life is progressive; ashis powers are limited, he must use means for the attainment of his ends, and intend first what he performs last; as by continual advances from his first stage of existence, he is perpetually varying the horizon of his prospects he must always discover new motives of action, new excitements of fear, and allurements of desire.

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