The Diplomacy of the War of 1914, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 1915 - World War, 1914-1918 - 728 pages
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Contents

Agadir
22
The TurcoItalian War
24
The Balkan Wars
26
The situation just before the War of 1914
34
ANALYSIS OF THE DOCUMENTS
39
CHAPTER II
41
Efforts of the powers to secure an extension of the time limit
59
The powers influence Servia to make a conciliatory reply
62
Servias reply
64
Austria rejects Servias reply
78
The powers urge Austria to delay military operations and accept the Servian reply as a basis for discussion
81
Austrian assurances
84
Austria declares war on Servia
85
Austria explains the purpose of her action
89
CHAPTER III
96
Russia believes Austrias action is directed against herself
105
Russia considers immediate action necessary
108
CHAPTER IV
117
Germany pledged to support Austria
123
The responsibility Russia will incur by supporting Servia
131
Germany delivers an ultimatum to Russia
142
France believes Germany intends to precipitate a war
155
France supports her ally
163
The German ultimatum to France
174
The issuance of the order for general mobilization
181
CHAPTER VII
195
Germany makes objection to mediation
205
Russia proposes to Austria to enter upon conversations
213
The powers employ their good offices at Vienna and St Peters
227
Efforts to discover a formula for mediation
229
Germany asked to press the button
231
The San Giuliano suggestion for mediation upon Servias uncondi tional acceptance of the ultimatum
234
The Cambon suggestion of mediation after Austrias occupation of Belgrade
236
The Grey proposal for a collective guaranty of the powers
239
Germany asks Russia to propose a formula
242
Austria agrees to mediation
252
The failure to reach a compromise
264
CHAPTER VIII
268
Efforts to prevent war
270
England refuses to take sides
273
The AngloFrench Entente
282
Germany invades Luxemburg
337
England agrees to protect the French coast
339
The British ultimatum
352
CHAPTER IX
371
The obligation to respect the treaty of April 19 1839
376
The obligation to make good the guaranty of neutrality
387
The right to make war and the equality of states
391
5 AngloBelgian conversations
395
Effect of Belgiums preparations against Germany
411
Alleged violations of Belgian neutrality
415
The violation of the neutrality of Luxemburg
422
Some considerations concerning Belgiums right to resist
431
Germany accuses England of misrepresentations in regard
441
CHAPTER X
457
CHAPTER XI
474
The determining causes of the war
491
The Peace power
500
Nationalism and internationalism
508
The results
514
Questions without answers
528
Apocryphal Will of Peter the Great the Sokolnicki Text
537
Treaty of Alliance between Austria and Germany October 7 1879
540
Convention between Great Britain and Russia concerning the interests
546
ANGLOGERMAN RELATIONS
560
Colonial Development and Removal of Conflicting Interests by
566
THE AUSTROSERVIAN DISPUTE
572
Negotiations of the Spanish and American Governments following
579
The Case of Servia Extract from a speech by Lloyd George Sep
586
BELGIAN NEUTRALITY
595
Treaty between Great Britain and Prussia relative to the independence
602
Extracts from Parliamentary Debates regarding the neutrality of Lux
610
Belgian Neutrality Gladstones letter to Bright August 1870
624
Remarks introductory to the Secret Documents by Bernhard Dernburg
631
The Nature of Neutrality etc Extracts from World Organization
638
The Melians Defense of their Neutrality against
645
The Hague Convention of 1907 relative to the settlement of interna
651
a letter by Bernhard Dernburg answering
661
Chronology
667
List of Citations
686
Statement relative to the publication of the Belgian Documents from
698
Copyright

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Page 531 - ... latter, without adequate inducement or justification. It leads also to concessions to the favorite nation, of privileges denied to others, which is apt doubly to injure the nation making the concessions ; by unnecessarily parting with what ought to have been retained ; and by exciting jealousy, ill will, and a disposition to retaliate, in the parties from whom equal privileges are withheld...
Page 532 - It is our true policy to steer clear of permanent alliances with any portion of the foreign world; so far, I mean, as we are now at liberty to do it ; for let me not be understood as capable of patronizing infidelity to existing engagements. I hold the maxim no less applicable to public than to private affairs, that honesty is always the best policy. I repeat it, therefore, let those engagements be observed in their genuine sense. But, in my opinion, it is unnecessary, and would be unwise to extend...
Page 585 - That the United States hereby disclaims any disposition or intention to exercise sovereignty, jurisdiction, or control over said island except for the pacification thereof, and asserts its determination, when that is accomplished, to leave the government and control of the island to its people.
Page 539 - Nothing contained in this convention shall be so construed as to require the United States of America to depart from its traditional policy of not intruding upon, interfering with, or entangling itself in the political questions or policy or internal administration of any foreign state ; nor shall anything contained in the said convention be construed to imply a relinquishment by the United States of America of its traditional attitude toward purely American questions.
Page 533 - I will only observe, that according to my understanding of the matter, that right, so far from being denied by any of the Belligerent Powers has been virtually admitted by all. The duty of holding a neutral conduct...
Page 601 - HER Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, his Majesty the Emperor of Austria, King of Hungary and Bohemia, his Majesty the King of the French, his Majesty the King of Prussia, and his Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias...
Page 543 - We do not guarantee any state against punishment if it misconducts itself, provided that punishment does not take the form of the acquisition of territory by any non-American power.
Page 440 - It is our duty to protest with indignation against an outrage against international law provoked by no act of ours. The Belgian Government are firmly determined to repel by all the means in their power the attack thus made upon their neutrality, and they recall the fact that, in virtue of article 10 of The Hague Convention of 1907 respecting the rights and duties of neutral Powers and persons in the case of war by land, if a neutral Power repels, even by force, attacks on her neutrality such action...
Page 348 - I am authorised to give an assurance that, if the German fleet comes into the Channel or through the North Sea to undertake hostile operations against French coasts or shipping, the British fleet will give all the protection in its power. "This assurance is of course subject to the policy of His Majesty's Government receiving the support of Parliament, and must not be taken as binding His Majesty's Government to take any action until the above contingency of action by the German fleet takes place.
Page 542 - ... years the intention of terminating it, it shall remain binding until the expiration of one year from the day on which either of the High Contracting Parties shall have denounced it. But if, when the date fixed for its expiration arrives, either ally is actually engaged in war, the alliance shall, ipso facto, continue until peace is concluded.

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