The Long Shadow of Little Rock

Front Cover
University of Arkansas Press, 2007 - Biography & Autobiography - 238 pages
7 Reviews
At an event honoring Daisy Bates as 1990's Distinguished Citizen then-governor Bill Clinton called her "the most distinguished Arkansas citizen of all time." Her classic account of the 1957 Little Rock School Crisis, The Long Shadow of Little Rock, couldn't be found on most bookstore shelves in 1962 and was banned throughout the South. In 1988, after the University of Arkansas Press reprinted it, it won an American Book Award.
On September 3, 1957, Gov. Orval Faubus called out the National Guard to surround all-white Central High School and prevent the entry of nine black students, challenging the Supreme Court's 1954 order to integrate all public schools. On September 25, Daisy Bates, an official of the NAACP in Arkansas, led the nine children into the school with the help of federal troops sent by President Eisenhower-the first time in eighty-one years that a president had dispatched troops to the South to protect the constitutional rights of black Americans. This new edition of Bates's own story about these historic events is being issued to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Little Rock School crisis in 2007.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
2
3 stars
1
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: The Long Shadow of Little Rock: A Memoir

User Review  - Cheri - Goodreads

I was reading this as background research for a graduate school paper, and kept getting sucked in by the story. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone studying the Brown v. Board decision ... Read full review

Review: The Long Shadow of Little Rock: A Memoir

User Review  - Sam - Goodreads

This was an eye-opening book for me. I hope to read more about this subject. I am proud though that my Dad was one of the paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division who were sent to Little Rock to protect Little Rock Nine. Read full review

Related books

Selected pages

Contents

LITTLE ROCK
1
REBIRTH
6
ACROSS MY DESK
32
GOVERNOR FAUBUS ROUSES THE MOB
59
SHE WALKED ALONE
69
OUT OF THE HILLS
77
A CITY GRIPPED BY FEAR AND TERROR
85
THE VOLCANO OF HATE ERUPTS
88
THE EMBATTLED NINE
113
THE APPEAL TO THE PRESIDENT
161
DEATH OF THE STATE PRESS
170
WHITE CASUALTIES
179
ON WHOSE SHOULDERS
214
HOW LONG HOW LONG ?
219
AFTERWORD
227
INDEX
233

THE FEDERAL TROOPS MOVE IN
98
ARREST
107

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

Eleanor Roosevelt, October 11, 1884 - November, 1962 Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City on October 11, 1884, to Anna Hall and Elliott Roosevelt. Her mother died in 1892, and she and her brother went to live with Grandmother Hall. Her father died only two years later. She attended a distinguished school in England when she became of age, at 15. She met and married her distant cousin Franklin, in 1905. In Albany, Franklin served in the state Senate from 1910 to 1913, and Eleanor started her career as political helpmate. She gained a knowledge of Washington and its ways while he served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy. When he was stricken with polio in 1921, she tended him and became active in the women's division of the State Democratic Committee to keep his interest in politics alive. He successfully campaigned for governor in 1928 and eventually won the Presidency with Eleanor by his side. When Eleanor came to the White House in 1933, she understood social conditions better than any of her predecessors and she transformed the role of First Lady. She never shirked official entertaining. She broke precedence to hold press conferences, traveled to all parts of the country and give lectures and radio broadcasts, and also wrote a daily syndicated newspaper column, "My Day." After the President's death in 1945 she returned to a cottage at his Hyde Park estate. Within a year, however, she became the American spokeswoman in the United Nations. She continued her career until her strength began to wane in 1962. She died in New York City that November, and was buried at Hyde Park beside her husband.

Clayborne Carson lives in Palo Alto, California.

Willard B. Gatewood is Alumni Distinguished Professor of History emeritus at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, and the author or coauthor of eleven other books, including Aristocrats of Color (University of Arkansas Press, 2000).

Bibliographic information