Indian Ink: A Play

Front Cover
Macmillan, Aug 17, 1995 - Drama - 83 pages
7 Reviews
Flora Crewe, a young poet travelling in India in 1930, has her portrait painted by a local artist. More than fifty years later, the artist's son visits Flor'as sister in London while her would-be biographer is following a cold trail in India.

The alternation of place and period in Tom Stoppard's new play (based on his radio play In The Native State) makes for a rich and moving exploration of intimate lives set against one of the great shafts of history, the emergence of the Indian subcontinent from the grip of Europe.
  

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Review: Indian Ink

User Review  - Joel - Goodreads

I don't think it did anything that Arcadia didn't do better. Certainly enjoyable, though. Read full review

Review: Indian Ink

User Review  - Jeff - Goodreads

This is a lovely play -- minor Stoppard to be sure, but as such, the characters actually have a little more room to breathe without being smothered by weighty concepts. Given that this is based on an ... Read full review

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About the author (1995)

Tom Stoppard's other work includes Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Tony Award), Jumpers, Travesties (Tony Award), Night and Day, After Margritte, The Real Thing (Tony Award), Enter a Free Man, Hapgood, Arcadia (Evening Standard Award, The Oliver Award and the Critics Award), Dalliance and Undiscovered Country, Indian Ink (a stage adaptation of his own play, In the Native State) and The Invention of Love.

His radio plays include The Dissolution of Dominic Boot, 'M' is for Moon Among Other Things, If You're Glad I'll Be Frank, Albert's Bridge (Italia Prize), Where Are They Now?, Artist Descending a Staircase, The Dog It Was That Died and In the Native State (Sony Award).

His work for television includes Professional Foul (Bafta Award, Broadcasting Press Guild Award). His film credits include Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead which he also directed (winner of the Golden Lion, Venice Film Festival).

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