The Days of the French Revolution

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Jun 23, 1999 - History - 384 pages
28 Reviews
Works from Les Misirables by Victor Hugo to Citizens by Simon Schama have been inspired by the French Revolution. Now available for the first time in years, The Days of the French Revolution brings to life the events that changed the future of Western civilization. As compelling as any fiction thriller, this real-life drama moves from the storming of the Bastille to the doomed court of Louis XVI, the salon of Madame Roland, and even the boudoir of Marie Antoinette. Hibbert recounts the events that swirled around Napoleon, Mirabeau, Danton, Marat, and Robespierre with eyewitness accounts and his "usual grace and flair for divulging interesting detail" (Booklist). This trade paperback edition has twenty-eight pages of black-and-white illustrations, and will be published in time for Bastille Day.

  

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Good introduction to a scary time. - Goodreads
This book gives a quick overview of a very dense topic. - Goodreads
Excellent introduction to the French Revolution. - Goodreads

Review: The Days of the French Revolution

User Review  - Micah - Goodreads

In the introduction of this book, the author says casually that the book will focus more on people than ideas in the French Revolution. Okay, whatever. It will readable, that's cool. I assumed, though ... Read full review

Review: The Days of the French Revolution

User Review  - Marguerite Kaye - Goodreads

I first read this about 15 or 20 years ago, and I remember being unequivocally for the Revolutionaries. Needing to remind myself of the salient points of the Revolution, which forms the backdrop of my ... Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
11
III
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IV
14
V
17
VI
47
VII
67
VIII
85
XII
191
XIII
219
XIV
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XV
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XVI
289
XVII
305
XVIII
319
XIX
329

IX
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XI
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XXI
342
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - ... put in execution would overturn the monarchy, nothing in reply appears, and not the least step is taken by the court to restrain this extreme licentiousness of publication. It is easy to conceive the spirit that must thus be raised among the people. But the coffee-houses in the Palais Royal present yet more singular and astonishing spectacles ; they are not only crowded within, but other expectant crowds are at the doors and windows, listening gorge dtployee to certain orators, who from chairs...
Page 41 - ... to certain orators, who from chairs or tables harangue each his little audience : the eagerness with which they are heard, and the thunder of applause they receive for every sentiment of more than common hardiness or violence against the present government, cannot easily be imagined.
Page 41 - The business going forward at present in the pamphlet shops of Paris is incredible. I went to the Palais Royal to see what new things were published, and to procure a catalogue of all. Every hour produces something new. Thirteen came out today, sixteen yesterday, and ninety-two last week.
Page 183 - Elisabeth's room, where we played at ball, and battledore and shuttlecock. In the evening the family sat round a table, while the Queen read to them from books of history, or other works proper to instruct and amuse the children.
Page 41 - I find there are but two or three that ', have merit enough to be known. Is it not wonderful, that while the press teems with the most levelling and even seditious principles, that if put in execution would overturn the monarchy, nothing in reply appears, and not the least step is taken by the court to restrain this extreme i licentiousness of publication.
Page 62 - Monsieur, tell those who sent you that we are here by the will of the People, and that nothing but the force of bayonets...
Page 183 - French papers which he found in the library. After the Dauphin had supped, I undressed him, and the Queen heard him say his prayers. At nine the King went to supper, and afterwards went for a moment to the Queen's chamber, shook hands with her and his sister for the night, kissed his children, and then retired to the turret-room, where he sat reading till midnight.
Page 184 - I have been twice called to be counsel for him who was my master, in times when that duty was coveted by every one. I owe him the same service now that it is a duty which many people deem dangerous.
Page 51 - When M. Necker comes in he is loudly and repeatedly clapped, and so is the Duke of Orleans ; also a Bishop who has long lived in his diocese and practised there what his profession enjoins. Another Bishop, who preached yesterday a sermon which I did not hear, is applauded, but those near me say that this applause is unmerited. An old man who refused to dress in the costume prescribed for the Tiers, and who appears in his farmer's habit, receives a long and loud plaudit. M.
Page 50 - Neither the King nor Queen appear too well pleased. The former is repeatedly saluted as he passes along with Wive le Roi; but the latter meets not a single acclamation. She looks, however, with contempt on the scene in which she acts a part, and seems to say, for the present I submit, but I shall have my turn.

References to this book

Autocracy
Gordon Tullock
Limited preview - 1987
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About the author (1999)

Christopher Hibbert, an Oxford graduate, has written more than fifty books, including Wellington: A Personal History, London: The Biography of a City, Redcoats and Rebels, and The Destruction of Lord Raglan. He lives with his family in Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire, England.

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