Medicine Park: Oklahoma's First Resort

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Arcadia Publishing, 2010 - History - 127 pages
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The historic cobblestone community of Medicine Park was founded on July 4, 1908, as Oklahoma's first planned resort. It is located in southwest Oklahoma at the entry to the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge, the second most visited wildlife refuge in the country, hosting 1.5 million annual visitors. Through the political connections of founder Sen. Elmer Thomas, the resort enjoyed a great deal of early success. Tourists flocked to the area to enjoy mountains, wildlife, swimming, fishing, food, and lodging. From its founding through the 1930s, it became a getaway to relax, "chum-around," gamble, and even partake in some illegal bootleg whisky. Medicine Park became known as the "jewel of the Southwest." There was a spa, dance hall, bathhouse, general store, school, hydroelectric plant, and cafe, along with creek swimming and tennis courts. Following World War II, the resort was subject to economic struggles that lasted more than four decades. Today much of the resort town of 400 has been restored and revitalized, and there is renewed excitement about its future.
  

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This is an excellent read! Amazing old photos and historical information. Nice layout too. If you want to learn about this charming resort community, it is a MUST READ! *****

Contents

Acknowledgments
6
Introduction
7
Historic Fort Sill
11
Wichita Mountains National Forest and Game Preserve
19
Law tons Founding
29
The Need for Water
35
Sen Elmer Thomas
43
Founding of Oklahomas First Resort
47
The Depression and World War II Era
79
Early 1950s and Becoming a Town
101
Medicine Parks Revitalization
119
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

David C. Lott--graphic designer, Web site developer, and entrepreneur--resides in Medicine Park. He has been an advocate for preservation, restoration, and revitalization of the resort for two decades.

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