The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, 1928 - Social Science - 495 pages
5 Reviews
With great wit and forcefulness, Shaw here presents the conditions under which he thought the world could look forward to the future with hope. This book sets out most completely Shaw's indictment of capitalism as the source of both domestic injustice and international enmity, and his arguments for a socialist egalitarian society as the only society assured a healthy future.
  

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Review: The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism

User Review  - Sarah Walsh - Goodreads

It has to be said, a Man writing a book for women perhaps he should have stuck to writing plays. Still, it's written by Shaw, a Man. Read full review

Review: The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism

User Review  - Lauren Salamon - Goodreads

I actually read an original copy from 1904 printed in London! Great economic explanations and very fitting for the time. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
6
III
7
IV
9
V
11
VI
14
VII
19
VIII
21
XLVI
177
XLVII
183
XLVIII
187
XLIX
196
LI
204
LII
213
LIII
225
LIV
231

IX
26
X
29
XI
30
XII
35
XIII
38
XIV
41
XV
49
XVI
53
XVII
56
XVIII
59
XIX
63
XX
65
XXI
68
XXII
70
XXIII
72
XXIV
80
XXV
83
XXVI
92
XXVII
95
XXVIII
100
XXIX
105
XXX
111
XXXI
117
XXXII
122
XXXIII
127
XXXIV
131
XXXV
133
XXXVI
137
XXXVII
140
XXXVIII
145
XXXIX
150
XLI
152
XLII
157
XLIII
161
XLIV
164
XLV
168
LV
239
LVI
243
LVII
251
LVIII
264
LIX
268
LX
274
LXII
276
LXIII
277
LXIV
279
LXV
284
LXVII
289
LXVIII
294
LXIX
297
LXX
299
LXXI
308
LXXII
314
LXXIII
319
LXXV
331
LXXVI
343
LXXVII
348
LXXVIII
354
LXXIX
359
LXXX
370
LXXXI
380
LXXXII
386
LXXXIII
391
LXXXIV
393
LXXXV
406
LXXXVI
412
LXXXVII
429
LXXXVIII
443
LXXXIX
455
XC
465
XCI
471
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xv - the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one; the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap.
Page xxi - If we have come to think that the nursery and the kitchen are the natural sphere of a woman, we have done so exactly as English children come to think that a cage is the natural sphere of a parrot — because they have never seen one anywhere else.
Page 19 - the good old rule, the simple plan, that they shall take who have the power, and they shall keep who can”,
Page xix - All these books are addressed to men. You might read a score of them without ever discovering that such a creature as a woman had ever existed. In fairness, let me add that you might read a good many of them without discovering that such a thing as a man

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About the author (1928)

Renowned literary genius George Bernard Shaw was born on July 26, 1856 in Dublin, Ireland. He later moved to London and educated himself at the British Museum while several of his novels were published in small socialist magazines. Shaw later became a music critic for the Star and for the World. He was a drama critic for the Saturday Review and later began to have some of his early plays produced. Shaw wrote the plays Man and Superman, Major Barbara, and Pygmalion, which was later adapted as My Fair Lady in both the musical and film form. He also transformed his works into screenplays for Saint Joan, How He Lied to Her Husband, Arms and the Man, Pygmalion, and Major Barbara. Shaw won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925. George Bernard Shaw died on November 2, 1950 at Ayot St. Lawrence, Hertfordshire, England.

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