Left-Handed History of World

Front Cover
Allen & Unwin, 2007 - History - 224 pages
2 Reviews
About 10 percent of the population is left-handed. However 16 percent of American presidents have been lefties. In fact, a disproportionately high number of left-handers factor in influential moments through history from Julius Caesar to Bill Gates. Through fascinating case studies of notables from ancient to modern times, Ed Wright explains the secret of lefty success. Psychology meets history in this fascinating and popular look at being left-handed and its effects on our world.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mbmackay - LibraryThing

A not-very-serious run-down of left handers who have made their mark on the world from Ramses II to Obama. More pop-psychology than real history, I enjoyed the fund of trivia gems hidden in the text. Read November 2013. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Sally_Newton - LibraryThing

I agree with the points made in the previous review, but this is a useful book in the sense that it is a good overview of left-handed people throughout history. There are people mentioned in this work ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
7
ALEXANDER THE GREAT
26
JOAN OF ARC
44
MICHELANGELO
62
ISAAC NEWTON
80
BEETHOVEN
100
LEWIS CARROLL
124
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
143
MARIE CURIE
156
MAHATMA GANDHI
169
BABE RUTH
186
JIMI HENDRIX
202
BILL GATES
220
NAVRATILOVA AND McENROE
237
FURTHER READING
251
Copyright

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Page 143 - What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not an end: what can be loved in man is that he is an overture and a going under.
Page 86 - His peculiar gift was the power of holding continuously in his mind a purely mental problem until he had seen straight through it. I fancy his pre-eminence is due to his muscles of intuition being the strongest and most enduring with which a man has ever been gifted.
Page 127 - A BOAT, beneath a sunny sky Lingering onward dreamily In an evening of July Children three that nestle near, Eager eye and willing ear, Pleased a simple tale to hear Long has paled that sunny sky: Echoes fade and memories die : Autumn frosts have slain July. Still she haunts me, phantomwise, Alice moving under skies Never seen by waking eyes.
Page 86 - Anyone who has ever attempted pure scientific or philosophical thought knows how one can hold a problem momentarily in one's mind and apply all one's powers of concentration to piercing through it, and how it will dissolve and escape and you find that what you are surveying is a blank. I believe that Newton could hold a problem in his mind for hours and days and weeks until it surrendered to him its secret. Then being a supreme mathematical technician he could dress it up, how you will, for purposes...
Page 139 - But I reckon I got to light out for the .Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me and I can't stand it. I been there before.
Page 143 - Man is a rope stretched between the animal and the Superman a rope over an abyss.
Page 104 - ... speak louder, shout, for I am deaf. Ah how could I possibly admit an infirmity in the one sense which should have been more perfect in me than in others, a sense which I once possessed in highest perfection, a perfection such as few...
Page 135 - ... death, the ablest minds in France, and answered them out of an untaught wisdom which overmatched their learning, baffled their tricks and treacheries with a native sagacity which compelled their wonder, and scored every day a victory against these incredible odds and camped unchallenged on the field. In the history of the human intellect, untrained, inexperienced, and using only its birthright equipment of untried capacities, there is nothing which approaches this. Joan of Arc stands alone, and...
Page 91 - Admiral," he said in a subsequent letter, "will never again be considered as useful ; therefore the sooner I get to a very humble cottage the better, and make room for a sounder man to serve the State.

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