Wisconsin Journal of Education, Volume 20 (Google eBook)

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Wisconsin State Teachers' Association, 1890 - Education
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Page 117 - There is a tide in the affairs of men Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; Omitted, all the voyage of their life Is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat; And we must take the current when it serves, Or lose our ventures.
Page 274 - And what is so rare as a day in June? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays : Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten ; Every clod feels a stir of might, An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Page 392 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Page 274 - All the earth is full of music, Little May, Bird, and bee, and water singing On its way. Let their silver voices fall On thy heart with happy call: " Praise the Lord, who loveth all,
Page 262 - Up through the long shady lane, Where the quail whistles loud in the wheat fields, That are yellow with ripening grain. They find, in the thick waving grasses, Where the scarlet-lipped strawberry grows, They gather the earliest snowdrops, And the first crimson buds of the rose.
Page 317 - Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O UNION, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate! We know what Master laid thy keel, What Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, What anvils rang, what hammers beat, In what a forge, and what a heat Were shaped the anchors of thy hope!
Page 183 - THE night has a thousand eyes, And the day but one; Yet the light of the bright world dies With the dying sun. The mind has a thousand eyes, And the heart but one; Yet the light of a whole life dies When love is done.
Page 378 - To elevate above the spirit of the age must be regarded as the end of education ; and this must stand clearly developed before us ere we mark out the appointed road. The child is not to be educated for the present for this is done without our aid unceasingly and powerfully but for the remote future, and often in opposition to the immediate future. The spirit which is to be shunned must be known.
Page 427 - The most skillful gauger I ever knew was a maligned cobbler, armed with a poniard, who drove a peddler's wagon, using a mullein stalk as an instrument of coercion to tyrannize over his pony shod with calks.

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