A Higher Duty: Desertion Among Georgia Troops During the Civil War

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U of Nebraska Press, Dec 1, 2005 - History - 227 pages
1 Review
This book addresses the most important issues associated with Confederate desertion. How many soldiers actually deserted, when did they desert, and why? What does Confederate desertion say about Confederate nationalism and the war effort? Mark A. Weitz has taken his argument beyond the obvious reasons for desertion?that war is a horrific and cruel experience?and examined the emotional and psychological reasons that might induce a soldier to desert. Just as loyalty to his fellow soldiers might influence a man to charge into a hail of lead, loyalty to his wife and family could also lead him to risk a firing squad in order to return home.
  

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Review: A Higher Duty: Desertion among Georgia Troops during the Civil War

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

A Higher Duty is a detailed look at desertion among Georgia troops during the Civil War. Mark Weitz examines the numbers, times of desertion, home counties of deserters, units in which the deserters ... Read full review

Contents

I
10
II
35
III
61
IV
90
V
121
VI
139
VII
171
Copyright

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Page 5 - I will support, protect and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States, and the Constitution and Government of the State of Nevada, against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign, and that I will bear true faith, allegiance, and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution or law of any State convention or Legislature to the contrary notwithstanding...
Page 5 - ... that I will support, protect, and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States, against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign, and that I will bear true faith, allegiance, and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution, or law of any State, Convention, or Legislature, to the contrary notwithstanding ; and further, that I do this with a full determination, pledge, and purpose, without any mental reservation or evasion whatsoever...

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About the author (2005)

Mark A. Weitz is the former director of the Civil War Era Studies Program at Gettysburg College. He is the author of More Damning than Slaughter: Desertion in the Confederate Army (Nebraska 2005).

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