Parnassus on Wheels (Google eBook)

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Doubleday, Page, 1917 - Booksellers and bookselling - 190 pages
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RandyMetcalfe - LibraryThing

Helen McGill is the long-suffering sister of the “Sage of Redfield”, her brother Andrew. For more than 15 years Helen has kept house for Andrew at Sabine Farm. Andrew, however, is more interested in ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bill_Bibliomane - LibraryThing

I read this in a couple of hours on a lazy Sunday, and honestly can't remember that I have read it before. Various points of the plot were a complete and total surprise, and I hadn't recalled quite ... Read full review

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Contents

I
3
II
12
III
23
IV
33
V
52
VI
70
VII
84
VIII
96
IX
114
X
123
XI
140
XII
153
XIII
164
XIV
175
XV
186
Copyright

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Page 137 - I should (said he) Bestow this jewel also on my creature, He would adore my gifts instead of me, And rest in Nature, not the God of Nature : So both should losers be. Yet let him keep the rest, But keep them with repining restlessness : Let him be rich and weary, that at least, If goodness lead him not, yet weariness May toss him to my breast.
Page 136 - There are three ingredients in the good life: learning, earning, and yearning. A man should be learning as he goes; and he should be earning bread for himself and others; and he should be yearning, too: yearning to know the unknowable. What a fine old poem is "The Pulley
Page 39 - when you sell a man a book you don't sell him just twelve ounces of paper and ink and glue — you sell him a whole new life. Love and friendship and humour and ships at sea by night — there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book I mean.
Page 39 - ... ink and glue — you sell him a whole new life. Love and friendship and humor and ships at sea by night — there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book I mean. Jiminy! If I were the baker or the butcher or the broom huckster, people would run to the gate when I came by — just waiting for my stuff. And here I go loaded with everlasting salvation — yes, ma'am, salvation for their little, stinted minds — and it's hard to make 'em see it. That's what...
Page 65 - New York is Babylon; Brooklyn is the true Holy City. New York is the city ofenvy, qfl1ce work and hustle; Brooklyn is the region of homes and happiness.
Page 13 - It was coloured a pale, robin's-egg blue, and on the side, in big scarlet letters, was painted : R. MIFFLIN'S TRAVELLING PARNASSUS GOOD BOOKS FOR SALE SHAKESPEARE, CHARLES LAMB, RLS HAZLITT, AND ALL OTHERS...
Page 66 - There is no hope for New Yorkers, for they glory in their skyscraping sins; but in Brooklyn there is the wisdonv of the lowly.
Page 39 - If I were the baker or the butcher or the broom huckster, people would run to the gate when I came by — just waiting for my stuff. And here I go loaded with everlasting salvation — yes, ma'am, salvation for their little, stinted minds — and it's hard to make 'em see it. That's what makes it worth while — I'm doing something that nobody else from Nazareth, Maine, to Walla Walla, Washington, has ever thought of. It's a new field, but by the bones of Whitman, it's worth while. That's what this...
Page 38 - He was a kind of traveling missionary in his way. A hefty talker, too. His eyes were twinkling now and I could see him warming up. "Lord!" he said, "when you sell a man a book you don't just sell him twelve ounces of paper and ink and glue — you sell him a whole new life. Love and friendship and humor and ships at sea by night — there's all heaven and earth in a book, a real book I mean, Jiminy! If I were the baker or the butcher or the broom huckster, people would run to the...
Page 137 - ... to shatter this sorry scheme of things and " then remould it nearer to the heart's desire," to indulge in other words the romantic type of imagination.

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